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I have a set of records, and I want to get the set of records between two records of the same type.

Consider this sample data:

ID   POSITION   TYPE
9    1          separator
7    2          one
8    3          three
5    4          one
2    5          separator
4    6          two
3    7          two
6    8          separator
1    9          four
11   10         five
10   11         three
12   12         five

I want to get the records from a specific separator to the next separator or the end of the record set.

Cases:

  1. Starting with record 2, I would expect to get records 4 and 3.
  2. Starting with record 6, I would expect to get records 1, 11, 10 and 12.

I can solve Case 1 with a sub-query, like this:

SELECT *
FROM table_name
WHERE position > 5
AND position < (
    SELECT MIN(position)
    FROM table_name
    WHERE position > 5
    AND type = 'separator'
)
ORDER BY position ASC

That solution will not work for Case 2, and it seems like there should be a way that doesn't use a sub-query.


SOLUTION

My solution is based on George's answer, and works, but I am concerned about it's potential lack of performance because of the coalesce function and sub-queries.

SELECT *
FROM table_name
WHERE `position` > 5
AND `position` < COALESCE(
    (SELECT MIN(`position`)
        FROM table_name
        WHERE `position` > 5
        AND `type` = 'separator'),
    (SELECT MAX(`position`) + 1
        FROM table_name))
ORDER BY `position` ASC
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this solves the second case as well as the first:

SELECT *
FROM table_name
WHERE position > 8
AND 
( position < (
    SELECT MIN(position)
    FROM table_name
    WHERE position > 8
    AND type = 'separator'
) OR 
  position <= (SELECT MAX(position) FROM table_name) 
)
ORDER BY position ASC

Of course you could first calculate the MAX(ID) and insert as a constant. The OR clause will probably kill performance so I wouldn't use it if I were working on large datasets, since the second case is a unique exception to the SQL solving the 1st case.

share|improve this answer
    
This looked great at first glance, but it's not handling the second case. –  Sonny Nov 1 '11 at 20:17
    
You are right, I just edited the answer. I'm guessing it'll work now. –  wisefish Nov 1 '11 at 20:37
    
It works for the second case now, but not the first. If you incorporate my answer below, I will delete my answer and accept yours. –  Sonny Nov 1 '11 at 20:49

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