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I have a problem. I get an error and I'm not sure why it's happening.

2>Home.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "**void __cdecl LogAString(char *,...)**" (?LogAString@@YAXPADZZ) referenced in function "**public: static void __cdecl X::Home::HomeStart(void)**" (?HomeStart@Home@X@@SAXXZ)
2>Widget.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "void __cdecl LogAString(char *,...)" (?LogAString@@YAXPADZZ)
2>J:\src\out.dll : fatal error LNK1120: 1 unresolved externals

Here's my code:

Log.h

#pragma once

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdarg>

void LogAString(char* fmt, ...);
void LogAnError(char* fmt, ...);

Log.cpp

#include "Log.h"

#include <Util/String/String Formatting.h> // defines format(). Does not have any errors or issues.

void LogAString(char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, fmt);
    vprintf(fmt, ap);
    va_end(ap);
};

void LogAnError(char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, fmt);

    auto formatted_string = format("ERROR: %s", fmt).c_str();
    LogAString(const_cast<char*>(formatted_string), ap);

    va_end(ap);
};

Home.cpp (extract)

#include "Home.h"
#include "Log.h"

namespace X {

void Home::HomeStart()
{
    while (true)
    {
        auto number_of_widgets = Widgets::Count();
        LogAString("Loading with %d widgets", number_of_widgets);
    }
}

} // namespace X

I thought I've declared and defined the functions in the header and cpp files respectively. Why am I getting these errors? I've been at it for a few hours now, and still not sure why this is happening. Using VC++ on VS 2010.

I'm not using any other external libraries at this point. The compile target is a DLL, "out.dll".

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3  
Is this log stuff in a separate project? –  FailedDev Nov 1 '11 at 20:13
    
@FaileDev, it's in the same project. –  Yuki Nov 1 '11 at 20:24
    
Well as a matter of fact I did compile your code and executed it and it runs fine. So you either have two projects or some magic thing is happening.. –  FailedDev Nov 1 '11 at 20:31
    
I think it might be Visual Studio magic. I've had issues like this before that were solved by creating an identical project and compiling. I'll try it when I get home. –  Yuki Nov 1 '11 at 23:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Did you remember to add Log.cpp to your project?

If so, then open the file log.obj in a hex editor. Search for the string LogAnError. It will be part of a larger decorated string. Use the undname command to undecorate it. Compare it with what the linker cannot resolve. Identify the difference and fix your LogAnError function so they match again.

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Thanks! For some weirdddd reason, Visual Studio's GUI said that Log.cpp was included in the project. However, when I looked at the MSBuild input that VS gave, Log.cpp was omitted! I scratched my head a bit and triple checked, and that was indeed the case. Manually adding the file to the list worked. Thanks! –  Yuki Nov 2 '11 at 6:24

Perhaps the namespace would have something to do with it, does it work without namespace X?

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3  
If you're just guessing, then you should post a comment, not an answer. –  ildjarn Nov 1 '11 at 20:14
    
Alright, thanks for the heads up. I'll keep that in mind. Im relatively new so i'm still getting a feel for the best way to do things. –  Marc DiMillo Nov 1 '11 at 20:15

This is a linker error, not a compiler error. That means you are correct that you properly referenced the header file in your code. As a matter of fact, your code compiled successfully.

But, then the linker went out to find the referenced functions in the libraries it was pointed to, and came back empty handed. Library references are defined in the property sheet for your VC++ project. Is your project outputting an Out.dll? It looks like the linker expects one. I would investigate the Linker section as well as what file your compilation is generating.

Post more info on your build and solution / project configuration, or even better exactly what is in your property sheets if that wasn't enough information.

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What kind of information should I add? I'd also like to add that I'm not using any other external libraries at this point. The compile target is a DLL, "out.dll". –  Yuki Nov 1 '11 at 20:26
    
I don't have my windows machine booted up right now, but I think my VC++ projects actually reference their own output dll. If that is correct, then I would be checking that path in the Linker section against the path in the output section. It seems like there should be a build configuration flag in the path. I.e. you are building in Debug, the output of the DLL would be /Debug/Out.dll. I would think this was setup correctly by default, though. Which makes me wonder if FailedDev isn't correct, and in fact you are trying to link a second library to the one containing LogAsString. –  Evan Nov 1 '11 at 20:58
    
Oh, I didn't know it referenced itself. I'm not trying to link a second library. Everything is self contained and I am encountering the error when compiling this library. –  Yuki Nov 1 '11 at 21:04
    
I just booted up a Windows environment to confirm that. Under the property sheet for one of my DLLs (looking at the raw XML instead of having to browse through the GUI) I have a VCLinkerTool section that contains an AdditionalDependencies node which has mylibrary.lib and an AdditionalLibraryDirectories node that is set as &(SolutionDir)\x64\$(ConfigurationName). Maybe things are different compiling static libraries vs dynamic, but it's worth giving that a try. I think both these properties are under the Linker section. –  Evan Nov 1 '11 at 21:08
    
Obviously, that x64 directory in the middle of the path is platform specific. And I'm sure it's possible that you have a completely different output path that doesn't depend on these variables. I think the important thing is to make sure the path to Out.dll is correct. –  Evan Nov 1 '11 at 21:10

OK so based on your comment :

The compile target is a DLL, "out.dll"

I would assume that you are using this out.dll at some other project. And when you try to do this you get the above linker errors. If this is the case , this happens because you don't export your functions. In addition having global functions like this is a bad practice. You should at least wrap them in some class e.g. Utils or somethng and declare them static :

Example Log.h :

#pragma once

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdarg>

class __declspec (dllexport) Utils
{
    public:
          static void LogAString(char* fmt, ...);
          static void LogAnError(char* fmt, ...);
};

Log.cpp should remain almost the same.

#include "Log.h"

#include <Util/String/String Formatting.h> // defines format(). Does not have any errors or issues.

void Utils::LogAString(char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, fmt);
    vprintf(fmt, ap);
    va_end(ap);
};

void Utils::LogAnError(char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, fmt);

    auto formatted_string = format("ERROR: %s", fmt).c_str();
    LogAString(const_cast<char*>(formatted_string), ap);

    va_end(ap);
};

Now when you use your .dll your functions will be exported and available to your other projects. You should also include the Log.h file in your include directories, and make sure that the "out.dll" is in the same output folder of your main project. Additionally you should add the out.lib to the additional libraries.

Hopefully this is your problem. Next time provide more details.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not using another project; I'm encountering the error while compiling the library itself. –  Yuki Nov 1 '11 at 21:05
    
@alan Then you are not showing us something that you should. You code compiles. –  FailedDev Nov 1 '11 at 21:06
    
That's literally all my code. I'll try it again in a new project with the same settings. Perhaa Visual Studio is playing me again, as it has before. (two identical projects. One compiles, the other doesn't) –  Yuki Nov 1 '11 at 22:36

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