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What is the correct output of preprocessing the following 3 lines under the C99 rules?

#define y(x) x
#define x(a) y(a
x(1) x(2)))

BTW cpp under linux produces an error message, but I can't see why the answer isn't simply

1 2

Assuming cpp is correct and I'm wrong, I'd be very grateful for an explanation. Thanks.

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What's the error message? cpp handles that under C99 just fine for me on my Mac, outputting 1 2. –  BoltClock Nov 1 '11 at 20:34
    
t.c:3:10: error: unterminated argument list invoking macro "y". If it works on your system it might be a genuine linux cpp bug. –  user1024423 Nov 1 '11 at 20:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When a macro is found, the preprocessor gathers up the arguments to the macro and then scans each macro argument in isolation for other macros to expand within the argument BEFORE the first macro is expanded:

6.10.3.1 Argument substitution

After the arguments for the invocation of a function-like macro have been identified, argument substitution takes place. A parameter in the replacement list, unless preceded by a # or ## preprocessing token or followed by a ## preprocessing token (see below), is replaced by the corresponding argument after all macros contained therein have been expanded. Before being substituted, each argument’s preprocessing tokens are completely macro replaced as if they formed the rest of the preprocessing file; no other preprocessing tokens are available.

So in this specific example, it sees x(1) and expands that, giving

y(1 x(2)))

It then identifies the macro call y(1 x(2)), with the argument 1 x(2) and prescans that for macros to expand. Within that it finds x(2) which expands to y(2 and then triggers the error due to there not being a ) for the y macro. Note at this point its still looking to expand the argument of the first y macro, so its looking at it in isolation WITHOUT considering the rest of the input file, unlike the expansion that takes place for 6.10.3.4

Now there's some question as to whether this should actually be an error, or if the preprocessor should treat this y(2 sequence as not being a macro invocation at all, as there is no ')'. If it does the latter then it will expand that y call to 1 y(2 which will then be combined with the rest of the input ()) and ultimately expand to 1 2

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+1 you nailed it. –  R.. Nov 1 '11 at 21:26
    
Ahh. Of course you're right. While expanding the argument '1 x(2)' we don't consume extra tokens after we hit y(2. Great answer. Thanks. –  user1024423 Nov 1 '11 at 21:55
    
I don't think there's any question that it should be an error - §6.10.3 says that an instance of the function-like macro name followed by a ( is always an invocation of the function-like macro. –  caf Nov 1 '11 at 23:08
    
@caf: as it doesn't explicitly say its an error, it should probably be considered undefined, so an implementation might do anything in this situation. –  Chris Dodd Nov 1 '11 at 23:21

After a macro is expanded, attempts to expand macros in the resulting text occur in isolation before it is combined with the surrounding text. Thus the attempt to expand y(1 gives this error. It would actually be very difficult to specify macro expansion that works the way you want, while still meeting lots of the other required behaviors (such as lack of infinite recursion).

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"After a macro is expanded, attempts to expand macros in the resulting text occur in isolation before it is combined with the surrounding text." — What is the corresponding wording in the c99 standard? I only have a copy of the c++11 draft standard here. It says something totally different: Then the resulting preprocessing token sequence is rescanned, along with all subsequent preprocessing tokens of the source file, for more macro names to replace. Is there a significant difference in this regard between the languages? –  n.m. Nov 1 '11 at 20:47
    
The text in C99 is similar: 6.10.3.4: "Then, the resulting preprocessing token sequence is rescanned, along with all subsequent preprocessing tokens of the source file, for more macro names to replace." It's unclear to me, but perhaps my answer is wrong and this is indeed a bug.. –  R.. Nov 1 '11 at 20:52
    
Thanks alot R.. & n.m. I'm leaning towards a bug but the GNU folks are generally pretty good at standards conformance. –  user1024423 Nov 1 '11 at 21:02
    
@n.m.: The latest version of the C99 standard (the original standard with the three Technical Corrigenda merged into it) is N1256. –  Keith Thompson Nov 1 '11 at 21:12
    
For an actually-usable html version: port70.net/~nsz/c/c99/n1256.html –  R.. Nov 1 '11 at 21:13

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