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Since Google Can Now Execute AJAX & JavaScript For Indexing, what does that mean for seo for google?

What do we have to do differently, and what can we change so google bots don't crawl through everything.

Before we had the luxury that did not happen, but now it seems that it is. And that could add to increased bandwidth due to the google crawlers.

How can we prevent google (and any other search engine in the future) from indexing our ajax code?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, just because Google does it doesn't mean anybody else does. It also doesn't mean that they're officially doing it for anybody other than the sites listed in the article or that they're doing it well yet.

Second, you can include a robots.txt file that will tell Google not to index certain pages.

Here are some links for more information about robots.txt files and Google's web crawlers:

http://www.google.com/support/webmasters/bin/answer.py?answer=156449
http://code.google.com/web/controlcrawlindex/docs/getting_started.html
http://code.google.com/web/controlcrawlindex/docs/robots_txt.html

http://code.google.com/web/controlcrawlindex/docs/crawlers.html

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How do you know how the google bot works when it comes to executing ajax code? does the robot.txt not come into affect until after or before it is executed? –  Neal Nov 1 '11 at 20:58
    
Google has to look at the robots.txt file first to know if you want your site indexed at all. They respect that file. So if you have a page with tons of ajax and you don't want it being hit, just the main page in that file. Google will likely not bother with it. Of course, there are no guarantees about anything you make publicly available. –  evan Nov 1 '11 at 20:59
    
but if i want my main site hit, just not for it to call all the ajax fns then im screwed! –  Neal Nov 1 '11 at 21:00
    
I think if you have a website that can't handle being viewed on occasion, you're in poor shape as it is. But as I stated above, the robots.txt file can specify certain pages not to index. The others will still be indexed. –  evan Nov 1 '11 at 23:15
    
@Neal - added some links for you –  evan Nov 1 '11 at 23:19

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