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My knowledge of programming is pretty basic, so I apologize if this question is poorly worded.

What I'm trying to figure out is if something such as this (written in C):

#define FOO 15
#define BAR 23
#define MEH (FOO / BAR)

is allowed. I would want the preprocessor to replace every instance of

MEH

with

(15 / 23)

but I'm not so sure that will work. Certainly if the preprocessor only goes through the code once then I don't think it'd work out the way I'd like.

I found several similar examples but all were really too complicated for me to understand. If someone could help me out with this simple one I'd be eternally grateful!

Best, llakais

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2  
Before reading your question, I thought you were asking whether a macro definition can define another macro, such as #define FOO(x) #define BAR x. The answer to that question (which you didn't actually ask) is no; a macro definition cannot include further preprocessor directives. I'm going to edit your title to make it clearer what you're asking. –  Keith Thompson Nov 1 '11 at 21:01
    
Thank you all very much. I'd never used this site before but had heard it was wonderful. Sorry about the confusion with the question title. It's amazing how helpful and quick you guys are. –  llakais Nov 1 '11 at 21:36
    
Google X-Macros, enjoy. –  Jake Nov 1 '11 at 21:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Short answer yes. You can nest defines and macros like that - as many levels as you want as long as it isn't recursive.

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Is order important? Can MEH be #defined first? –  David Heffernan Nov 1 '11 at 21:04
    
I can't quote the standard, but I think it does not matter. I've been doing both forward and backward nested macro definitions for a long time and it works in VC++, GCC, ICC, etc... –  Mysticial Nov 1 '11 at 21:07
6  
@DavidHeffernan: The order is not important, all that matters is to have MEH, FOO and BAR all defined when MEH appears. The preprocessor first replaces MEH with (FOO / BAR), then start again, replacing first FOO with 15 then BAR with 23 –  DirtY iCE Nov 1 '11 at 21:09

The answer is "yes", and two other people have correctly said so.

As for why the answer is yes, the gory details are in the C standard, section 6.10.3.4, "Rescanning and further replacement". The OP might not benefit from this, but others might be interested.

6.10.3.4 Rescanning and further replacement

After all parameters in the replacement list have been substituted and # and ## processing has taken place, all placemarker preprocessing tokens are removed. Then, the resulting preprocessing token sequence is rescanned, along with all subsequent preprocessing tokens of the source file, for more macro names to replace.

If the name of the macro being replaced is found during this scan of the replacement list (not including the rest of the source file's preprocessing tokens), it is not replaced. Furthermore, if any nested replacements encounter the name of the macro being replaced, it is not replaced. These nonreplaced macro name preprocessing tokens are no longer available for further replacement even if they are later (re)examined in contexts in which that macro name preprocessing token would otherwise have been replaced.

The resulting completely macro-replaced preprocessing token sequence is not processed as a preprocessing directive even if it resembles one, but all pragma unary operator expressions within it are then processed as specified in 6.10.9 below.

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Yes, it's going to work.


But for your personal information, here are some simplified rules about macros that might help you (it's out of scope, but will probably help you in the future). I'll try to keep it as simple as possible.

  • The defines are "defined" in the order they are included/read. That means that you cannot use a define that wasn't defined previously.

  • Usefull pre-processor keyword: #define, #undef, #else, #elif, #ifdef, #ifndef, #if

  • You can use any other previously #define in your macro. They will be expanded. (like in your question)

  • Function macro definitions accept two special operators (# and ##)

operator # stringize the argument:

#define str(x) #x
str(test); // would translate to "test"

operator ## concatenates two arguments

#define concat(a,b) a ## b
concat(hello, world); // would translate to "helloworld"

There are some predefined macros (from the language) as well that you can use:

__LINE__, __FILE__, __cplusplus, etc

See your compiler section on that to have an extensive list since it's not "cross platform"

  • Pay attention to the macro expansion

You'll see that people uses a log of round brackets "()" when defining macros. The reason is that when you call a macro, it's expanded "as is"

#define mult(a, b) a * b
mult(1+2, 3+4); // will be expanded like: 1 + 2 * 3 + 4 = 11 instead of 21.
mult_fix(a, b) ((a) * (b))
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Yes, that is supported. And used quite a lot!

One important thing to note though is to make sure you paranthesize the expression otherwise you might run into nasty issues!

#define MEH FOO/BAR

// vs

#define MEH (FOO / BAR)

// the first could be expanded in an expression like 5 * MEH to mean something 
//   completely different than the second
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Miky, a small correction: parenthesis should be definitely used in macros, but are not necessary in this case: x * (FOO / BAR) == (x * FOO) / BAR == x * FOO / BAR –  BasicWolf Nov 1 '11 at 21:16
    
The second definition might have issues too, for example when FOO is 2+2 –  anatolyg Nov 1 '11 at 21:18
1  
@BasicWolf Integer division makes it problematic: 5 * (10/3) is 15, while 5 * 10/3 is 16 –  anatolyg Nov 1 '11 at 21:22
    
@anatolyg: Yes, but typically macros that expand to expressions already parenthesize the expression specifically to avoid suprises when the macro is used. –  delnan Nov 1 '11 at 21:22
    
@BasicWolf: Your reasoning is incorrect. Arithmetic equalities like the one you cited are true for fields, but neither integers nor floating point numbers form a field. –  R.. Nov 1 '11 at 21:29

Yes, it will work as expected. However, there is something important you should address: both of the constants are integers. When you compile this code, the pre-processor replaces all instances of MEH with (15 / 23), and the optimizer will likely simplify this to ( 15 / 23 ) = ( 0 )

This is because it is being handled as integer division, which results in integer truncation.

eg:

1 / 1 = 1
1 / 3 = 0
3 / 2 = 1

ie: assume it always rounds down.

You should be using literal numeric suffixes. So, if you want the result of your macro to have a fractional component, you would redefine your macros like so:

#define FOO 15.0f
#define BAR 23.0f
#define MEH (FOO / BAR)

Now MEH is replaced with (0.652173913f) instead of ( 0 ).

A summary can be seen below, as demonstrated from http://www.dotnetperls.com/suffix:

Suffix type: unsigned int
Character:   U
Example:     uint x = 100U;

Suffix type: long
Character:   L
Example:     long x = 100L;

Suffix type: unsigned long
Character:   UL
Example:     ulong x = 100UL;

Suffix type: float
Character:   F
Example:     float x = 100F;

Suffix type: double
Character:   D
Example:     double x = 100D;

Suffix type: decimal
Character:   M
Example:     decimal x = 100M;
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