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I am new to ruby and looking for an elegant way to sort the following hash.

Hash A:

a = { :metric1 => {
          "Bob" =>10,
          "Jane" =>15,
          "Sally" =>20
      },                
      :metric2 => {  
          "Jane" =>15,
          "Bob" =>10,
          "Sally" =>10 
      },         
      :metric3 => {  
          "Bob" =>10,
          "Sally" =>10,
          "Jane" =>5
      }
    }

Hash B:

b = { "Bob" => {
        :metric1 =>10,
        :metric2 =>10,
        :metric3 =>10
      },
      "Jane" => {
        :metric1 =>15,
        :metric2 =>15,
        :metric3 =>5
      },
      "Sally" => {
        :metric1 =>20,
        :metric2 =>10,
        :metric3 =>10
      }
    }

Essentially I want an easy way to iterate this object to output a table like:

        Metric 1  Metric 2  Metric 3
Bob     10        20        20
Jane    15        15        5
Sally   20        10        10
share|improve this question
    
shouldn't the values in "a" and "b" match? –  tokland Nov 1 '11 at 22:12
    
Thanks @tokland. updated my post –  johnmdonahue Nov 1 '11 at 22:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Functional approach (assumes all people have the same metric keys):

names = a.values.first.keys
b = Hash[names.map do |name| 
  [name, Hash[a.map { |metric, values| [metric, values[person]] }]]
end]

[Edit] A second approach, proably more orthodox than my first attempt. It uses Facets (so it may look a bit cryptic for those unfamiliar the new abstractions it procides). However, it's easy if you check the output of each step:

triplets = a.flat_map { |metric, h| h.map { |name, value| [name, metric, value] } }
pairs_by_name = triplets.map_by { |name, metric, value| [name, [metric, value]] }
b = pairs_by_name.mash { |name, pairs| [name, pairs.to_h] }
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot thank you enough. Perfect! –  johnmdonahue Nov 1 '11 at 22:22
    
+1 for a great yet unreadable answer :) –  apneadiving Nov 1 '11 at 22:24
    
@apneadiving: I was personally offended by that remark :-) updated with a second phrasing. –  tokland Nov 1 '11 at 22:33
    
ahah :) does this work with ree or 1.8.7? –  apneadiving Nov 1 '11 at 22:35
1  
I don't have ree to test, but no problem with 1.8.7, no new magic used (so I guess ree also ok). I should add that Enumerable#mash comes from facets: rubyworks.github.com/facets/doc/api/core/Enumerable.html. Granted, the first snippet is a bit ugly, but the culprit is basically the horrible non-OOP Hash[...] constructor. –  tokland Nov 1 '11 at 22:37

I'd more simply do:

h = {}
a.each do |metric, hash|
  hash.each do |name, value|
    h[name] ||= {}
    h[name][metric] = value
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
it looks like to_sym is creating :"Bob" as the pointer instead of just "Bob".... nevermind my mistake. –  johnmdonahue Nov 1 '11 at 22:28
    
oops, yes and it was useless :) –  apneadiving Nov 1 '11 at 22:29
    
+1, I won't argue that in this case a imperative loop is less verbose and slightly more clear than a functional one. Though, to be clear, each is still evil :-) –  tokland Nov 1 '11 at 22:44
    
@tokland: should I be offended myself? ;) –  apneadiving Nov 1 '11 at 22:48
    
@tokland For my edification, how evil is each? Evil memory-wise? or something else? –  Matt Dressel Jul 16 '13 at 5:58

Here's an answer with a more functional flavor. It handles the case where some names only occur in some hashes -- let's say Sally only was only present for :metric3 -- albeit by putting nils in the result hash

metrics = a.keys
names = a.values.map { |v| v.keys }.flatten.uniq

names.inject({}) do |memo, name|
  memo[name] = metrics.inject({}) do |memo, metric|
    memo[metric] = a[metric][name]
    memo
  end
  memo
end
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