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I will say in advance, and out of respect for your time and the site - this is a homework assignment. However, I have already thought of and written a solution, but I am a bit aggravated by the fact that I am unable to profile it successfully or obtain a relevant third party opinion elsewhere as to whether it is in fact a good one.

Say I have a simple table of film participation information (person, film, persons relationship to the film) like the following:

create table film
(
    person_name varchar(48) not null,
    film_title varchar(128) not null,
    relation varchar(48) not null
);

-- { 'Mel Gibson', 'Braveheart', 'director' }
-- { 'Mel Gibson', 'Braveheart', 'cast' }
-- { 'Steven Spielberg', 'A.I.' , 'director' }
-- { 'Hilary Swank', 'Million Dollar Baby', 'cast' }
-- etc

The database and the table are not created or maintaned by me, I am simply to query information from it.

I need to produce a set of person names for directors who are cast (act in front of the camera) in each and every film they have directed. The condition should not hold for people who have directed at least one film in which they didn't act, or for people who haven't directed anything.

My query (that as far as I can attest produces correct result set), lo and behold:

(   
    select  person_name 
    from    film 
    where   relation = 'director'
)
except 
(
    select person_name
    from 
    (   
        (
            select  person_name, film_title 
            from    film 
            where   relation = 'director'
        ) 
        except 
        (   
            select  person_name, film_title 
            from    film 
            where   relation = 'cast'
        )
    ) as director_behind_camera_for_film
)

I would like to know whether the query is sound, or if I have been thinking completely wrong about this? If the latter, could you please provide me with a better solution or an explanation thereof?

Don't pay much attention to the fact that I use strings everywhere (where surrogate keys could have been used insted) - this is a simplified example, yet it still demonstrates my challenge.

share|improve this question
1  
Just a minor comment: there is no need to put the individual SELECTs for the EXCEPT into parentheses (neither the outer one nor the inner one) – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 2 '11 at 8:18
SELECT tmp.person_name FROM
(
   SELECT person_name, film_title, COUNT(relationship) as cnt
   FROM film
   WHERE relationship IN ('cast', 'director')
   GROUP BY person_name, film_title
) as tmp
GROUP BY person_name
HAVING SUM(cnt) = COUNT(cnt)*2

or

SELECT tmp.person_name FROM
(
   SELECT person_name, film_title, COUNT(DISTINCT(relationship)) as cnt
   FROM film
   WHERE relationship IN ('cast', 'director')
   GROUP BY person_name, film_title
) as tmp
GROUP BY person_name
HAVING SUM(cnt) = COUNT(cnt)*2
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you're missing the from keyword – Conrad Frix Nov 1 '11 at 22:59
    
I am sleepy (and about to sleep). sorry if I made a syntax error, it was just to show the logic I would go for – frail Nov 1 '11 at 23:01
    
@frail, I appreciate your effort, and it's an interesting take on my problem. Best of all, it appears to work :) I will wrap my head around it tomorrow. – amn Nov 1 '11 at 23:03
    
you are welcome :) – frail Nov 1 '11 at 23:05
    
@amn You know this breaks if you add a relation producer, and someone is a director and producer but not a cast member – Conrad Frix Nov 1 '11 at 23:08

"I need to produce a set of person names for directors who are cast (act in front of the camera) in each and every film they have directed. The condition would thus not hold for people who have directed at least one film in which they didn't act, or for people who haven't directed anything."

The latter part of your phrase ("or for people who haven't directed anything") is incorrect.

If a person X has not directed anything, then the set of films X has directed is the empty set, and it may have been explained to you (if not, then I'm doing it now) that a universal quantification (has been cast in ALL ...) over the empty set always yields "true".

So if X has not directed anything at all, it is indeed the case that X has been cast in "ALL films he has directed", and hence, X should be included in the result set. (If this is not how the requirement is, the requirement should state so explicitly.)

That said, I explained the details of the operation of relational division (which is what you need to get your results) in Can all SQL queries be represented in Relational Algebra, Domain and Tuple relational calculus .

The subjects are different (managers and employees instead of directors and films), but the nature of the query is exactly the same : get me the X's that have a Z relationship to ALL Y's.

EDIT

I've realized later that there is a "tiny" difference : in this particular example of directors and actors and films, the set of "all Y's" is itself "dependent" on what particular X is under consideration. That is an extra complication that falls outside the realm of the more typical applications of relational divide. Addressing this might require the construction of relations with relation-valued attributes, using GROUP() or so, but I haven't worked out the details (and it is unlikely that operators such as GROUP() were part of your lectures).

Apologies to anyone who has been led to overlook this particular aspect of the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
you have many valid points, but I have edited my question to better specify the condition, which should not hold for people who have directed zero films, regardless of your correct understanding of the meaning of "all". Thank you for the link (to a related question), it's a very useful read. The problem with relational divide is that it either is always underexplained, badly explained, not explained at all or explained without teaching how to apply it with SQL. – amn Nov 3 '11 at 11:27
    
    
Under that assumption (the requirement is "persons who have directed at least one film and were cast in all of them), your query is correct. About the problem with relational divide : this operator has quite a history behind it, I know of at least four different versions of the operator (there might be even more), and all of them can actually be expressed in terms of other (primitive) operators (as your example case also demonstrated). – Erwin Smout Nov 3 '11 at 23:07

This looks as if it should work and it is more standard SQL:

select director.person_name 
from film director 
full outer join film actor 
    on director.person_name = actor.Person_name
    and director.film_title= actor.film_title
where actor.relationship = 'cast'
and director.relationship = 'director'
and actor.person_name is not null
and director.person_name is not null
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work if you add person who both directed and acted in one film and then only acted in another. They have to do both in each and every film – Conrad Frix Nov 2 '11 at 5:08
    
I tested for that condition. and it does work. – HLGEM Nov 2 '11 at 13:25
    
Hmm in this Data.SE Query Clint Eastwood is returned and isn't supposed to be due to the each and every requirement since in the sample data he acted in but didn't direct Dirty Harry. – Conrad Frix Nov 2 '11 at 14:07
    
@Conrad, I think in this case you got it slightly wrong - it's ok for a director to act in a film they didn't direct (for the condition to hold). The requirement is that if they direct a film then they must act in it - "for all films as F, if X directed F then X must have been cast in F as well". Whether they also are cast in or are otherwise related to films they didn't direct, has no effect on the condition. – amn Nov 2 '11 at 17:29
    
@Amn got it. For some reason the wording really confused me – Conrad Frix Nov 2 '11 at 18:11

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