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I have a delimiter ":" and need to extract word1 word2 word3 and word4 from below:

word1:word2:word3:word4

What is the RegEx to extract word1, word2, word3 and word4.

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2  
Hi. What have you tried? If not tried anything, try it out and then ask here if it did not work. –  manojlds Nov 1 '11 at 22:21
    
What do you mean extract? Replace it with commas? Put it in an array? If so, what language? –  switz Nov 1 '11 at 22:21
    
You don't need a regex for this. Just a split. Which platform/language are you using? –  FailedDev Nov 1 '11 at 22:25

4 Answers 4

Depending on the language you're using you would most likely be better using a split function.

e.g. in C# you would do.

var words = "word1:word2:word3:word4".split(":");
//word[0] = "word1"
//word[1] = "word2"
//ect...
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Regex below match any number of words separated by colons:

 /([^:]+)/g

or match custom number of words

/([^:]{min_number,max_number})/g

simple way in javascript:

 "word:word:word".match( /([^:]+)/g ) 

You will get array:

["word","word","word" ]
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Below Regex will match 4 non-colon words separated by colons:

/([^:]+):([^:]+):([^:]+):([^:]+)/
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he didn't mention any languages. why are you guys keeping asking the language? just because it is a typical "split" case? It could be that he has a long text with that format, and he just want to extract the words with some shell command or text editor.

In this case, a regex solution makes sense.

[^:]*(?=:)|(?<=:)[^:]*

this would work for the requirement. extract words. test with grep:

kent$   echo "word1:word2:word3:word4"|grep -Po '[^:]*(?=:)|(?<=:)[^:]*'
word1
word2
word3
word4
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