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2d Maze from a text file?
Recursively Solving A Maze

So I read in a text file, it makes it into a 2d array and then prints it out, the starting point is char S and the ending point is point F, valid moves occur only on the dotted lines and the # signs are the walls, trying to find a recursive method to do this, got my method started called escape() but iono what to do for the algorithm.

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class Maze
{
    char[][] maze = new char[12][12];
    int startX, startY;
    int endX, endY;

    public Maze() throws IOException
    {
        create();
    }

    public void create() throws IOException
    {   
        FileInputStream in = new FileInputStream("maze.txt");
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));

        for(int j = 0; j<maze.length; j++)
        {
            maze[j] = br.readLine().replaceAll(" ", "").toCharArray();
        }
        for(int i = 0; i<12; i++)
        {
            System.out.println("");
            for (int j = 0; j<12;j++)
            {
                System.out.print(maze[i][j]);
            }
        }


        for(int i = 0; i<12; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j<12; j++)
            {
                if(maze[i][j] == 'S')
                {
                    startX = i;
                    startY = j;
                }
                if (maze [i][j] == 'F')
                {
                    endX = i;
                    endY = j;
                }
            }
        }
        escape(startX, startY); 
    }


    public boolean escape(int x, int y)
    {
        return true;
    }

}
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marked as duplicate by bdares, Brian Roach, Dan J, Tim Bender, Dori Nov 2 '11 at 0:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Think that third time will be the charm? Stop asking us to do homework for you. –  NickLH Nov 2 '11 at 0:02
5  
Unfortunately eventually someone does do their work for them. –  Brian Roach Nov 2 '11 at 0:06
2  
I think my answer is appropriate, it guides but does not blatantly give code. –  jli Nov 2 '11 at 0:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well first you need a base condition. How about "If we're trying to escape from the goal coordinate, we know it's true."

public boolean escape(int x, int y) {
    if(x == endx && y == endy) return true;

    return false;
}

Also, if we're trying to escape from a wall, that's no good:

public boolean escape(int x, int y) {
    if(x == endx && y == endy) return true;
    if(x < 0 || y < 0 || x > maze.length || y > maze[x].length) return false;
    if(isWall(maze[x][y]) return false; // make isWall method

    return false;
}

This is a start, but it's not going to help us get from the start to the end. So how about we try walking in all directions (at the same time)

public boolean escape(int x, int y) {
    if(x == endx && y == endy) return true;
    if(x < 0 || y < 0 || x > maze.length || y > maze[x].length) return false;
    if(isWall(maze[x][y]) return false; // make isWall method

    return escape(x+1,y) || escape(x-1,y) || ecscape(x,y+1) || escape(x,y-1);
}

But this has a problem too. It will try to escape from the same squares over and over again! So we have to mark squares as visited. Let's say that '.' is unvisited, but ',' is visited.

public boolean escape(int x, int y) {
    if(isVisited(x,y)) return false; // make isVisited method
    if(x == endx && y == endy) return true;
    if(x < 0 || y < 0 || x > maze.length || y > maze[x].length) return false;
    if(isWall(maze[x][y]) return false; // make isWall method


    return escape(x+1,y) || escape(x-1,y) || ecscape(x,y+1) || escape(x,y-1);
}

If we want to know the direction we took, we have to do this:

public boolean escape(int x, int y) {
    if(isVisited(x,y)) return false; // make isVisited method
    if(x == endx && y == endy) return true;
    if(x < 0 || y < 0 || x > maze.length || y > maze[x].length) return false;
    if(isWall(maze[x][y]) return false; // make isWall method


    if(escape(x+1,y) || escape(x-1,y) || ecscape(x,y+1) || escape(x,y-1)) {
        System.out.println(x + ", " + y);
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
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3  
also, in the last block of code, you need to add a line that marks the current square as visited (unless isVisited does that itself, and if it does, shame on you) –  Tim Gostony Nov 2 '11 at 0:01
    
So awesome awesome awesome, you rock. !!! –  Calvin Moss Nov 2 '11 at 0:04
    
Note: this won't find the shortest path through the maze, just a path out of potentially many. –  jli Nov 2 '11 at 0:05

Recursively, the easiest algorithm is a depth first search. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth-first_search

Essentially the algorithm is as follows for a 2D graph:

dfs(int x, int y) {
    if (x, y) is the exit, return 0
    if (x, y) is already visited or (x, y) is a wall, return infinity
    mark the point (x, y) as visited in an array
    return 1 + the minimum out of dfs(x+1, y), dfs(y+1, x), dfs(x-1, y), dfs(y-1, x)
        // The output you return is part of the shortest path
        // e.g. if dfs(x+1, y) is the smallest of the 4, then (x+1, y) is on the shortest path
}

This is a shortest path problem, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shortest_path_problem for some good information about them.

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Thank you! especially for the example with the 2d array, helps alot you rock! –  Calvin Moss Nov 1 '11 at 23:59

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