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I have an object that looks like:

var object = [
    {"begin":0,  "end":20}, 
    {"begin":30, "end":300},
    {"begin":40, "end":60}, 
    {"begin":40, "end":50},
    {"begin":80, "end":100},
    {"begin":80, "end":100},
    {"begin":350,"end":370}
]

I would like to iterate over this object and sort it in the following form:

0   to 20   -> start here
30  to 300  -> next smallest number from 20 is 30
350 to 370  -> start from previous `end`, next number after 300 is 350.

// now, since there is no larger number than 370, start loop again.
40  to 60   -> start from 40 since this is the smallest unused number
80  to 100  -> next unused smallest number from 60 is 80

// now, since there is no larger unused number than 100, start loop again.
40  to 50
80  to 100

Either returning the same array or a new array would be fine.

Any help is always appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
In the first sorted subset, why did you pick 30 to 300 specifically? – Anurag Nov 2 '11 at 0:20
    
It's difficult to tell what you are asking – Joe Nov 2 '11 at 0:22
    
@Anurag: because the next smallest number from 20 is 30. – user1024718 Nov 2 '11 at 0:22
    
Please explain your desired sort order in more detail. Why does 40 to 60 go after 350 to 370? – jfriend00 Nov 2 '11 at 0:22
    
@jfriend00: I updated the question with more details :) – user1024718 Nov 2 '11 at 0:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

See a working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/bXNLT/2/

function sortItems(items) {
    items = items.slice() // make a copy
        // sort by "begin", in case the 
        // data isn't pre-sorted
        .sort(function(a,b) {
            return a.begin - b.begin;
        });
    var sorted = [], 
        idx = 0, 
        item;
    while (items.length) {
        // move the current item into the sorted array
        item = items.splice(idx, 1)[0];
        sorted.push(item);
        // find next index
        for (; idx<items.length; idx++) {
            if (items[idx] && items[idx].begin > item.end) {
                break;   
            }
        }
        // reset to 0 if we went too far
        idx = idx < items.length ? idx : 0;
    }
    return sorted;
}

Usage:

var arr = [
    {"begin":0,  "end":20}, 
    {"begin":30, "end":300},
    {"begin":40, "end":60}, 
    {"begin":40, "end":50},
    {"begin":80, "end":100},
    {"begin":80, "end":100},
    {"begin":350,"end":370}
];
sortItems(arr); // sorted as you specify
share|improve this answer

For what you want to do, normal sorting (even with a custom function) likely won't work for the entire thing.

However, you should use it to get the elements in a good order for further processing. Sort first by beginning, secondly by end.

Then, if you add a "dirty" flag to each data set, it becomes way easier.

var obj = [
    {"begin":0,  "end":20,   "dirty": false}, 
    {"begin":30, "end":300,  "dirty": false},
    {"begin":40, "end":60,   "dirty": false}, 
    {"begin":40, "end":50,   "dirty": false},
    {"begin":80, "end":100,  "dirty": false},
    {"begin":80, "end":100,  "dirty": false},
    {"begin":350,"end":370,  "dirty": false}
];

function getNextSet(arr)
{
  var ret = [];
  var lastEnd = -1;

  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
  {
     if (arr[i].begin >= lastEnd && arr[i].dirty == false)
     {
        ret.push(arr[i]);
        arr[i].dirty = true;
        lastEnd = arr[i].end;
     }
  }

  return ret;
}

// do custom sorting as mentioned in the other answer to get in a good starting state

var set = [];
do {
  set = getNextSet(obj);
  // do whatever
} while (set.length != 0);
share|improve this answer
    
ret.append() should be ret.push(). But even with this fix I get set == [] at the end - possible the do whatever line needs more elucidation :) – nrabinowitz Nov 2 '11 at 0:59
    
That's where you use the data in the set. After the while loop set will always be [] - that's how the loop knows that there are no more items in the list to be processed. – evan Nov 2 '11 at 5:45

Javascript arrays have a sort method which can take a comparison function as a parameter:

var data = [...]; // your data here
data.sort(function(a, b) {
    // insert your logic here
    // return values:
    //  -1 (a less than b)
    //   0 (a equal to b)
    //   1 (a greater than b)
});

There are some more examples of this approach on this site.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think a standard sort() function will meet the OP's use case, which requires multiple passes through the data. – nrabinowitz Nov 2 '11 at 0:48
    
This is not a solution/answer. It's one possible to tool to use (which perhaps belongs in a comment), but not even close to a complete answer. The main part of this problem is how to implement this type of custom sort algorithm. – jfriend00 Nov 2 '11 at 1:18

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