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So I have been trying to implement piping in my own shell program so that I can actually understand what UNIX is doing. I'm very very close at the moment, but for some reason my program is going into an infinite loop when I pipe. I'm pretty sure my problem is stemming from my waitpid arguments not ever letting the last pipe close, because if I make the final loop in the code below be i is less than count-1 instead of i is less than count it will run the command on the left of the pipe. But once I put it back to i is less than count it just loops forever.

           if(pipes)
                   {
            for (i=0;i<count-1;i++)
            {

                 if( pipe(fd) ==-1)
                 {
                 perror("Pipe failure");
                 return;
                 }

                read[i+1] = fd[0];
                write[i] = fd[1];
            }
        }

    for(i=0;i<count;i++)
    {
        pid = fork();

        if(pid < 0)
        {printf("fork failed");}

        else if(pid>0)
        {pids[i] = pid;}
        else
        { 
            if(write[i] != -1)
            {
                if(dup2(write[i],STDOUT_FILENO) ==-1)
                {
                perror("dup2 failure");
                exit(1);
                }
            }
            if(read[i] !=-1)
            {
                if (dup2(read[i], STDIN_FILENO)==-1)
                {
                perror("dup2 failure");
                exit(1);
                }
            }
        for (j=0; j<count; j++)
            {
            close(write[j]);
            close(read[j]);
            }

    execvp(input[i], input);
    exit(1);
        }//end else
    }//end for


  for(i=0; i < count; i++){


  if(write[i] != -1)
  close(write[i]);

  if( read[i] != -1)
  close (read [i]);

  waitpid(pids[i], &status,0);
 }
           }
    return (status);}

I think I'm really really close to the solution but for the time being I'm stuck. I've researched piping a ton, but I guess I'm just not quite getting it. Thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
    
Are you using dup2 backwards? –  Joel Spolsky Nov 2 '11 at 1:30
1  
Sorry, I know that the compiler doesn't care about whitespace, but when I see code where the indenting doesn't even remotely match what's going on, I assume there are probably dozens of other sloppy mistakes, so the first thing I do is carefully go through formatting the code properly, putting the braces in the right place, and getting all the indenting to match the semantics of the code. Half the time I find the bug right there. –  Joel Spolsky Nov 2 '11 at 1:31
    
Sorry about that, just using vim instead of my normal newer editors and this program has gone to hell and back with weird changes over the last few hours. I suppose some formatting is in order. –  Smeasum Nov 2 '11 at 1:56

1 Answer 1

Please format your code. It is unreadable right now.

That being said, a few errors:

  • You are not setting write[0]. You are setting write[count-1] and read[count].
  • You are waiting for pids[i] while the parent still has read[i] open. If input[i] wants will not exit until it gets EOF on stdin, it will never happen.
share|improve this answer
    
I'm a bit confused. write[i] should set write[0] and read[1] when i=0. I never use the count variable in brackets. Are you saying I need to change it to read[count]. Also, the code has been formatted. –  Smeasum Nov 2 '11 at 3:16
    
@Smeasum, your code shows i starting at 1 so write[0] isn't set, and i has a last loop at count-1 so read[i+1] gets set. –  ephemient Nov 2 '11 at 3:20
    
Oh I'm sorry about that. I forgot to update my code on here. I have that set to (int i=0; i<count-1; i++). For the second thing, are you saying to move my waitpid call to the bottom. If so, I have tried both suggestions with no luck as of yet. Thank you for your help so far, and sticking through my mess of code earlier. All my changes thus far have been edited up at the top. –  Smeasum Nov 2 '11 at 3:31

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