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I wrote this program,

include <stdio.h>

int main(){
int size = 5;

int row;
int col;

  for (col=0; col<size; col++){
    for (row=0; row<col;row++){
      printf(" ");
    }

    for (row=0; row <(size-col) ; row++){
      printf("*");
    if(col<=size){
      printf("*");
      }
    }
    printf("\n");
  }
  return 0;
}

It should make a triangle like

*********
 *******
  *****
   ***
    *

But instead there is one extra * on every line. What is the problem?

Thanks a lot!

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1  
Your use of the col and row variables is all backwards. I'm just pointing this out as you seem to be learning C. –  bitmask Nov 2 '11 at 1:09
    
damn really? I totally agree it seems silly to call them something that refers specifically to a row or a column when really they are just variables that help you change the number of spaces and stars. if you can elaborate i'd be very thankful. damn I'm really blown though I submitted it and I wonder if I'll get style points for it. thanks –  Arthur Collé Nov 2 '11 at 2:41
4  
@colle: I'd be more afraid of angering the Ancient Gods of Inconsistent Indentation from their Slumber. –  hugomg Nov 2 '11 at 3:04
    
Hey missingno, I never managed to catch you in Blue. One day... In all seriousness, I hope you're not referring to this program! The indentations seem legit to me, at least if its wrong I stayed wrongly consistent through the entire program. If there is a problem, tell me how I could improve. Thanks –  Arthur Collé Nov 2 '11 at 3:29
    
@colle: Yes, the indentation of your program is ... sorry ... horrible. Anyway, what I meant by col and row was that you are iterating over rows in the outer loop, but you're calling the iterator variable col. Then, in the inner loop, where you iterate over the columns of one particular row, you call the iterator variable row. –  bitmask Nov 2 '11 at 14:55
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5 Answers

Mystical has a solution to the way you're printing two asterisks an iteration. Using the identifiers row and col in your example also makes things more confusing than just i and j, especially since the outer loop is actually your current row.

An alternative to your mess is (I'm hoping this isn't homework since it's not tagged as such):

int main(void)
{
   int size = 5;
   int i, j;

   for (i = size; i > 0; i--) {

      for (j = i; j < size; j++)
         putchar(' ');

      for (j = 0; j < i*2 - 1; j++)
         putchar('*');

      putchar('\n');
   }

   return 0;
}

You could also put i*2 - 1 in a variable so that it's not calculated at each iteration of the loop (unless the compiler sees that you're not modifying i).

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+1 for restructuring the program into a much more legible format too! –  septical Nov 2 '11 at 1:04
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Changing

if(col<=size){

to

if((row % size) > 0){

will have the same effect too.

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How about printing the *'s like this

for (row=0; row<(9-2*col); row++)
  printf("*");
printf("\n");

This will print nine of the first row, seven on the second, etc.

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Factor your problem into relevant variables and give them meaningful names. This will improve code readability and make bugs easier to fix, e.g.:

#include <stdio.h>

void triangle(int height)
{
    int row, col;
    int width = (2 * height) - 1;

    for (row = 0 ; row < height ; row++)
    {
        for (col = 0 ; col < width ; col++)
        {
            if (row > col)
            {
                putchar(' ');
            }
            else if (col < width - row)
            {
                putchar('*');
            }
        }
        puts("\r");
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    triangle(5);
    return 0;
}
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No one brought up recursion? It's not quite pure because you have to track depth. I called it a pyramid (pyr_) instead of a triangle:

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h>

static void pyr_line(int depth, int nrows) {
    int i;

    if (nrows == 0) return;

    for (i=0; i<depth; i++)
            printf(" ");

    for(i=0; i<(2*(nrows-1)+1); i++)
            printf("*");

    printf("\n");
    pyr_line(depth+1, nrows-1);
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    pyr_line(0, atoi(argv[1]));
    return 0;
}
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