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When you override a member function that is not virtual in a class with no virtual functions, VS compilers occurs the "_BLOCK_TYPE_IS_VALID" error.

For example,

class A{
public:
    int a;
public:
    void func(){}
    ~A(){}
};

class B : public A{
public:
    virtual void func(){}

    ~B(){}
};

int main(void){
    A* a = new B();
    delete a;  // error!

    return 0;
}

I guess this is because in main(), the a has vtable but the compiler misses it and can't get the exact size of the header?

Somebody can get my curiosity about this shattered?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
A does not have a vtable as there are no virtual functions in it. A is a POD class. –  jmucchiello Nov 2 '11 at 1:42
    
@jmucchiello A has a user-defined destructor, so it doesn't qualify as a POD. Close, though. –  ephemient Nov 2 '11 at 1:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can remove A::func() and the program is still erroneous.

The real reason is that A::~A() (not B::~B()) is being called on an object of type B.

See C++ FAQ § 20.7 "When should my destructor be virtual?"

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but what if I let A::~A() be same, and change void func() to virtual void func()? Then the error is gone, which is why I didn't remove A::func() from class A. –  YayCplusplus Nov 2 '11 at 2:23
    
@YayCplusplus: Purely by accident of memory layout. It's still undefined behavior. –  ephemient Nov 2 '11 at 2:39
    
Thanks! I appreciate it. –  YayCplusplus Nov 8 '11 at 2:08

You're trying to destroy an object using pointer to the base class, but the destructor is not virtual. If a class is part of a inheritance hierarchy, always make dtors virtual.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, non-virtual destructors are fine if you never call the wrong one. But that's not the case here. –  ephemient Nov 2 '11 at 1:44

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