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Below is the code for a singleton class


class single{
private:
    int i;
    single(int x): i(x){ 

    }
public:
    static single& getInstance(){
        static single s(10);
        return s;
    }

    void incPrint(){
        ++i;
        cout i  " ";
    }
};

Now the same code gives two different results for 2 different code


single d1 = single::getInstance();
    d1.incPrint();
    d1.incPrint();

    single d2 = single::getInstance();
    d2.incPrint();
    d2.incPrint();

This code produces the output:

11 12 11 12

Whereas this code


    single & d1 = single::getInstance();
    d1.incPrint();
    d1.incPrint();

    single & d2 = single::getInstance();
    d2.incPrint();
    d2.incPrint();

produces the result

11 12 13 14

where the latter is the desired output. Is this anomaly because of design issues or user coding issues ? How to make sure only the second result is obtained ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
The first one (without declaring your variables as reference types) are copy constructing single instances when you call single::getInstance(). –  birryree Nov 2 '11 at 2:09
    
One of the main reasons not to put so much effort into designing a class that can only be instantiated once (and then designing around the assumption that this works) is that it's so hard to get right in C++. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 2 '11 at 2:57
    
@Karl Knechtel : I have been working with Java for quite some time. That makes getting a proper design in CPP a hard task !!! –  bsoundra Nov 2 '11 at 3:02
    
I don't particularly approve of singletons in Java, either; just that in C++ there's this one additional annoyance. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 2 '11 at 3:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

T x = foo() makes a copy.

Or behaves "as if" it made a copy.

While T& x = foo(), when foo returns a T& reference, only makes a reference.


Make the copy constructor and copy assignment operator private. That will prevent people from making copies all. Making the copy assignment operator private prevents self-copying.

It is not an alternative to return a pointer to the singleton from getInstance. That would be a surefire way to let people be unaware of the guarantee that there's always an instance. A pointer indicates that it can be a nullpointer.

The best alternative is, however, to not use singletons if you can avoid it. There are many problems with singletons. These problems include lifetime management, thread safety and interaction with tools that detect memory leaks.

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
    
wow!, I did not realize making a destructor private would make it work. Thanks. –  bsoundra Nov 2 '11 at 2:18
    
@bsoundra: i just edited that, because making a destructor private would still allow new-ing a new instance. sorry about that. i fixed that error at the same time you wrote your comment. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 2 '11 at 2:24
    
But 'making a destructor private' also prevented the first case. But you dont recommend it ? –  bsoundra Nov 2 '11 at 2:57
    
You only mention technical difficulties, but the real problem of Singletons are the implicit dependencies. That's a design issue. –  fredoverflow Nov 2 '11 at 6:39
    
@Fred: whatever works. e.g., the dependencies issue pales in comparision with the spaghetti information flow issue. the technical issues i mentioned are, i think, more effective arguments (more well known, easier to understand, not already decided as irrelevant) for the intended audience. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 2 '11 at 12:13

Remove the copy constructor(make it private). That will prevent people from making copies.

Another alternative would be to return a pointer to the singleton for getInstance(). That would be a sure-fire way to let people know they have a reference to the singleton.

A third alternative would be to have a copyable wrapper class around the shared data. This wrapper would have a pointer or such to the singleton, and be copyable.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not want to deal with pointer for the very reason Alf mentioned. Making the constructor private worked good –  bsoundra Nov 2 '11 at 2:20

You are returning a reference to the singleton variable properly but it is what you are assigning it to that is the problem.

This code:

single d1 = single::getInstance();

means:

Create a new variable of type single and copy the returned reference to initialise it. So every time you do this, you are creating a new variable instead of using the singleton variable.

This code:

single & d1 = single::getInstance();

means:

Create a new reference to the same variable as the returned reference. So every time you do this you are getting a reference to the singleton variable, as desired.

To stop yourself (and others) from making this mistake you should make your constructor private.

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