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Disclaimer: This question is meant to be purely theoretical, so please don't ask me why I'm doing this.

If I have the following code:

- (void) beginCatastrophe {
    double delayInSeconds = 3.5;
    dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, delayInSeconds * NSEC_PER_SEC);
    dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_global_queue(0, 0), ^(void){
        Class cls = [self class];
        IMP replacement = class_getMethodImplementation(cls, @selector(fooReplacement:));
        Method fooMethod = class_getInstanceMethod(cls, @selector(foo:));
        method_setImplementation(fooMethod, replacement);
    });

    [self foo:1];
}

- (void) fooReplacement:(unsigned) x {}

- (void) foo:(unsigned) x {
    [self foo:++x];
}

And somewhere else in my code, I call -beginCatastrophe

This results in a "too much recursion" error. Why?

I have confirmed that the swizzling code works after 2 seconds, but not any more than that.

However, if I do something like this:

- (void) beginCatastrophe {
    double delayInSeconds = 3.5;
    dispatch_time_t popTime = dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, delayInSeconds * NSEC_PER_SEC);
    dispatch_after(popTime, dispatch_get_global_queue(0, 0), ^(void){
        Class cls = [self class];
        IMP replacement = class_getMethodImplementation(cls, @selector(fooReplacement:));
        Method fooMethod = class_getInstanceMethod(cls, @selector(foo:));
        method_setImplementation(fooMethod, replacement);
    });

    [self foo:nil];
}


- (void) fooReplacement:(id) x { 
    printf("%s", _cmd); 
}

- (void) foo:(id) x {
    [self performSelector:_cmd withObject:x afterDelay:0.00001];
}

This, of course works fine no matter how long I make the delayInSeconds.

share|improve this question
    
My guess is that you didn't pull off the replacement the way you intended, and the pre-replacement version of foo: will certainly recur until it can't anymore. –  Hot Licks Nov 2 '11 at 2:53
    
@DanielRHicks The replacement code works - it's just a question of the runtime's ability to apply the IMP swap. –  Jacob Relkin Nov 2 '11 at 2:54
    
More to the point, the compiler may be "short-circuiting" calls within the same class under some circumstances, and would be highly likely to short-circuit recursive calls within a method itself. Try moving your foos into a separate class. –  Hot Licks Nov 2 '11 at 2:55
    
(If the replacement code really worked you wouldn't be getting infinite recursion.) –  Hot Licks Nov 2 '11 at 2:55
1  

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is only a guess, but I would guess that your stack is being exhausted well before that background task fires. You have it set to fire 3.5 seconds from now, then you continue on and recursively call foo. 3.5 seconds will put a ton of frames on the stack and will exhaust it before the method is swizzled.

If it's not this, then perhaps it is an issue with how this dispatch works with your runloop. You never do exit that beginCatastrophe method so the runloop never gets a chance to turn once you call it. Perhaps the swizzling thread never gets called? If you put a log statement in fooReplacement: does it get called?

share|improve this answer
    
I think you're right about my stack getting exhausted. So this will perform differently across different machines. I see. –  Jacob Relkin Nov 2 '11 at 3:09
    
Certainly if control returns immediately from dispatch_after then replacement will not occur and foo will recur infinitely. The spec is ambiguous on whether dispatch_after returns immediately. It may be that it waits for up to 2 seconds but returns immediately for longer waits. All sorts of reasons why this code wouldn't work and precious few for why it would. –  Hot Licks Nov 2 '11 at 3:10
1  
@DanielRHicks dispatch_after returns immediately. –  Jacob Relkin Nov 2 '11 at 3:15
    
+1 this sounds correct to me –  Dave DeLong Nov 2 '11 at 3:19
    
@JacobRelkin -- It's just that the spec says that "the function waits" or something along those lines, which could easily be interpreted to mean that it does not return immediately. –  Hot Licks Nov 2 '11 at 11:31

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