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I'm having some issues using Node.js as a http client against an existing long polling server. I'm using 'http' and 'events' as requires.

I've created a wrapper object that contains the logic for handling the http.clientrequest. Here's a simplified version of the code. It works exactly as expected. When I call EndMe it aborts the request as anticipated.

var http = require('http');
var events = require('events');

function lpTest(urlHost,urlPath){
    this.options = {
        host: urlHost,
        port: 80,
        path: urlPath,
        method: 'GET'
    };
    var req = {};
    events.EventEmitter.call(this);
}

lpTest.super_ = events.EventEmitter;
lpTest.prototype = Object.create(events.EventEmitter.prototype, {
    constructor: {
        value: lpTest,
        enumerable: false
    }
});

lpTest.prototype.getData = function getData(){
    this.req = http.request(this.options, function(res){
        var httpData = "";

        res.on('data', function(chunk){
            httpData += chunk;
        });

        res.on('end', function(){
            this.emit('res_complete', httpData);
        }
    };
}

lpTest.prototype.EndMe = function EndMe(){
    this.req.abort();
}

module.exports = lpTest;

Now I want to create a bunch of these objects and use them to long poll a bunch of URL's. So I create an object to contain them all, generate each object individually, initiate it, then store it in my containing object. This works a treat, all of the stored long-polling objects fire events and return the data as expected.

var lpObject = require('./lpTest.js');
var objWatchers = {};

function DoSomething(hostURL, hostPath){
    var tempLP = new lpObject(hostURL,hostPath);
    tempLP.on('res_complete', function(httpData){
        console.log(httpData);
        this.getData();
    });
    objWatchers[hosturl + hostPath] = tempLP;
}

DoSomething('firsturl.com','firstpath');
DoSomething('secondurl.com','secondpath);
objWatchers['firsturl.com' + 'firstpath'].getData();
objWatchers['secondurl.com' + 'secondpath'].getData();

Now here's where it fails... I want to be able to stop a long-polling object while leaving the rest going. So naturally I try adding:

objWatchers['firsturl.com' + 'firstpath'].EndMe();

But this causes the entire node execution to cease and return me to the command line. All of the remaining long-polling objects, that are happily doing what they're supposed to do, suddenly stop.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
There are quite a number of syntax errors in this code which makes it more difficult to test. Can you update this to fix the missing requires, parentheses, and add two urls that you are actually using for testing? – geoffreak Nov 2 '11 at 16:17
    
I've ammended the code. Sorry it's an internal system at my work so I cannot provide a working system to test against. The hostURL is in the form of an IP address and hostPath is the specific long-polling resource. – Barry Lender Nov 2 '11 at 20:20

Could it have something to do with the fact that you are only calling getData() when the data is being returned?

Fixed code:

function DoSomething(hostURL, hostPath){
    var tempLP = new lpObject(hostURL,hostPath);
    tempLP.on('res_complete', function(httpData){
        console.log(httpData);
    });
    tempLP.getData();
    objWatchers[hosturl + hostPath] = tempLP;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see where in this code that getData is called initially? – geoffreak Nov 2 '11 at 20:16
    
Hopefully not... that's the way it's intended to work. 1. Create the long-poll request and send it (sorry I missed out where I call getData() on the objects after they return from DoSomething(). 2. Wait for the 'res_complete' event. Then re-call getData to re-seed my long-poll request – Barry Lender Nov 2 '11 at 20:16

I have seemingly solved this, although I'm note entirely happy with how it works:

var timeout = setTimeout(function(){
        objWatchers['firsturl.com' + 'firstpath'].EndMe();
    }, 100);

By calling the closing function on the object after a delay I seem to be able to preserve the program execution. Not exactly ideal, but I'll take it! If anyone can offer a better method please feel free to let me know :)

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