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I'm having a hard time refilling the stack after i take it all off in order to print it out. I am using node implementation so i think this fact is what is confusing me. Any suggestions would be appreciated, thank you.

This is my original stack::print()

// Function to print Gumball info field (color and counter)
void Stack::print()
{
    Node *p;
    Type x;

    while(top != NULL) {
        p = top;
        x = p -> getinfo();
        cout << " " << x.color << " " << " " << x.counter << endl << endl;
        top = p -> getnext();
    } 

    return;
}

This is my stack with my attempt to loop and store in temp. It compiles but still is not working as suppose to

void Stack::print()
{
    Node *p,*q;
    Type x,x_temp;

    while(top != NULL) {
        p = top;
        x = p -> getinfo();
        cout << " " << x.color << " " << " " << x.counter << endl << endl;
        x_temp = x;
        q = top;
        top = p -> getnext();
    }

    while(top != NULL) {
        q -> setinfo(x_temp);
        q -> setnext(top);
        top = q;
    }
    return;
}

share|improve this question
    
Is top a member variable? If so, why are you modifying it inside print? print should leave your stack unchanged. –  Emile Cormier Nov 2 '11 at 4:50
    
I attempted to only modify it to print the stack then return everything back to its original.... basically get the info from the top, print it then move on the next gumball. After that I want to move everything from the temp stack back into the original in the same order. –  123me Nov 2 '11 at 4:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Stack::print shows a current "snapshop" of your stack, so it has no business modifying any of Stack's member variables. There's no need to make a "backup" of the stack and to restore it. You just have to walk down the stack in a manner that doesn't disturb the stack.

Instead of making the top member variable walk down the stack, initialize a local Node pointer to be the same as top and make the local pointer walk down the stack.

In other words, top should be read-only (immutable) within your print member function. To enforce that a member function must not modify any member variables, you can make the member function immutable by adding the const keyword at the end of your member function declaration.

Example:

// Const member function enforces that the Stack remain unmodified
void Stack::print() const
{
    Node *p = top; // Make p initially point to the top of the stack
    Type x;

    while(p != NULL) {
        x = p -> getinfo();
        cout << " " << x.color << " " << " " << x.counter << endl << endl;
        p = p->getNext(); // Make p walk down the stack to the next Node.
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh ok I see. I always was also able to figure out how to store the original items in the temporary stack... then empty the temporary stack placing them back onto the original stack in order. Thank you. –  123me Nov 2 '11 at 5:27

If you want to print the contents of a stack and then push all the values back in the same order, I would suggest pushing the values onto a different stack after printing them. Then once the original stack is empty, pop all of the values from the second stack back into the original stack.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited my question... I showed my attempt to save on a temp stack and push all the elements from temp back into the original stack, refer to my original question. –  123me Nov 2 '11 at 4:10

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