Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
gcc (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.1-9ubuntu3) 4.6.1
    c89

Hello,

Just wondering is there a better way to do this with the code I have provided below.

I am building a sdp (session description protocol) string from some parameters.

However, I might need to extend the sdp to include other parameters i.e. video codecs.

However, I don't really want to have another if else to build the complete string I have done below.

I am just wondering is this scalable enough? Is there any technique I could use that is better than what I have done.

I have just copied the funcion that does the sdp building:

void create_sdp_string(char *sdp_string, char reinvite)
{
    char session_id[MAX_STRING_LEN];
    char session_version[MAX_STRING_LEN];
    const char *local_ip_addr = "10.10.10.244";
    apr_time_t time_usec = 0;
    char session_identifier[MAX_STRING_LEN];
    char media_transport[MAX_STRING_LEN];
    char connection_info[MAX_STRING_LEN];
    const char *audio_port = "49152";

    /* Required sdp attributes */
#define V_PROTOCOL_VERSION "0"
#define USERNAME "JOEBLOGGS"
#define NETTYPE "IN"
#define ADDR_TYPE "IP4"
#define S_SESSION_NAME "SIP_CALL"
#define T_TIME_DESCRIPTION "0 0"
#define M_MEDIA_NAME_TRANSPORT_ADDR "RTP/AVP 0 8 101"
#define A_PCMU "rtpmap:0 PCMU/8000"
#define A_PCMA "rtpmap:8 PCMA/8000"
#define A_TELEPHONE "rtpmap:101 telephone-event/8000"

    /* Get the time in micro seconds to create an unique session id */
    time_usec = apr_time_usec(apr_time_now());
    apr_snprintf(session_id, MAX_STRING_LEN, "%lu", (unsigned long)time_usec);

    /* Get the time in micro seconds to create an unique session version */
    time_usec = apr_time_usec(apr_time_now());
    apr_snprintf(session_version, MAX_STRING_LEN, "%lu", (unsigned long)time_usec);

    /* Build session identifier */
    apr_snprintf(session_identifier,
                 MAX_STRING_LEN,
                 "o="USERNAME" "NETTYPE" %s %s "ADDR_TYPE" %s\n",
                 session_id,
                 session_version,
                 local_ip_addr);

    /* Build media transport */
    apr_snprintf(media_transport,
                 MAX_STRING_LEN,
                 "m=audio %s "M_MEDIA_NAME_TRANSPORT_ADDR"\n",
                 audio_port);

    /* Build connection information */
    apr_snprintf(connection_info,
                 MAX_STRING_LEN,
                 "c="NETTYPE" "ADDR_TYPE" %s\n",
                 local_ip_addr);

    if(reinvite == FALSE) {
        /* Build complete sdp string for cases that are not reinvite */
        apr_snprintf(sdp_string,
                     MAX_SDP_STRING_LEN,
                     "v="V_PROTOCOL_VERSION"\n"
                     "%s"
                     "s="S_SESSION_NAME"\n"
                     "%s"
                     "t="T_TIME_DESCRIPTION"\n"
                     "%s"
                     "a="A_PCMU"\n"
                     "a="A_PCMA"\n"
                     "a="A_TELEPHONE"\n",
                     session_identifier,
                     connection_info,
                     media_transport);
    }
    else if(reinvite == TRUE) {
        /* Build complete sdp string for cases that are for reinvite 'inactive' */
#define INACTIVE "inactive"
        apr_snprintf(sdp_string,
                     MAX_SDP_STRING_LEN,
                     "v="V_PROTOCOL_VERSION"\n"
                     "%s"
                     "s="S_SESSION_NAME"\n"
                     "%s"
                     "t="T_TIME_DESCRIPTION"\n"
                     "%s"
                     "a="A_PCMU"\n"
                     "a="A_PCMA"\n"
                     "a="A_TELEPHONE"\n"
                     "a="INACTIVE"\n",
                     session_identifier,
                     connection_info,
                     media_transport);
    }
}

Many thanks for any suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
you don't mention it, but I reckon you are sending the result over a (TCP/UDP) socket. This sounds a lot like optimizing the wrong place then. That said, I'd prevent the multiple buffer allocations if you can avoid them –  sehe Nov 12 '11 at 22:24
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+25

If you want something more generic look at this:

void append_to_sdp_string(char *sdp_string, char *param)
{
  int size = strlen(sdp_string);
  apr_snprintf(sdp_string + size, MAX_SDP_STRING_LEN - size, "%s\n", param);
}

void create_sdp_string(char *sdp_string, char reinvite)
{
  /* Defines and variables here */

  apr_snprintf(session_id, MAX_STRING_LEN, "%lu", (unsigned long) apr_time_usec(apr_time_now());
  apr_snprintf(session_version, MAX_STRING_LEN, "%lu", (unsigned long) apr_time_usec(apr_time_now());
  apr_snprintf(session_identifier, MAX_STRING_LEN, "o="USERNAME" "NETTYPE" %s %s "ADDR_TYPE" %s", session_id, session_version, local_ip_addr);
  apr_snprintf(media_transport, MAX_STRING_LEN, "m=audio %s "M_MEDIA_NAME_TRANSPORT_ADDR"", audio_port);
  apr_snprintf(connection_info, MAX_STRING_LEN, "c="NETTYPE" "ADDR_TYPE" %s", local_ip_addr);

  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, "v="V_PROTOCOL_VERSION);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, session_identifier);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, "s="S_SESSION_NAME);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, connection_info);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, "t="T_TIME_DESCRIPTION);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, media_transport);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, "a="A_PCMU);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, "a="A_PCMA);
  append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, "a="A_TELEPHONE);

  if(reinvite == TRUE)
    append_to_sdp_string(sdp_string, "a="INACTIVE);

  /* Here you can add as many simple conditional appends as you need */
}

This way it's easy to append anything to string which you already created.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks good. I think the best answer so far. Thanks. –  ant2009 Nov 11 '11 at 16:30
add comment

I consider the if/else if statement at the bottom of your code to be pretty ugly because you have copied a lot of code to two different places. You might edit it one place but forget to edit it in another. You should really try to avoid this. One way to do this is to replace the if/else if statement with this:

apr_snprintf(sdp_string,
  MAX_SDP_STRING_LEN,
  "v="V_PROTOCOL_VERSION"\n"
  "%s"
  "s="S_SESSION_NAME"\n"
  "%s"
  "t="T_TIME_DESCRIPTION"\n"
  "%s"
  "a="A_PCMU"\n"
  "a="A_PCMA"\n"
  "a="A_TELEPHONE"\n"
  "%s",
  session_identifier,
  connection_info,
  media_transport,
  reinvite ? "a=inactive\n" : "");

EDIT1: Another way to make this code better would be to write your own version of printf adds bytes to sdp_string, and then call that function once for each different piece of information you want to add to the string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that worked fine. I did actually think about that. But not sure what the empty string would produce. However, I am still looking for an even better solution if there is one available. thanks. –  ant2009 Nov 2 '11 at 9:27
    
The empty string doesn't cause any problems. printf("%s",""); should print zero characters. –  David Grayson Nov 2 '11 at 16:22
add comment

If there is a performance bottleneck in your code this is not the if/else structure, but the fact that you scan all your strings several times.

Basically you use your variant of snprintf mostly to concatenate strings, this is very unefficient.

Switch to a strategy that writes the strings in place just one after another, as you would do with fputs if this were a file:

  • first, for the two numbers that you print, keep track of the resulting string length which is given through the return of snprintf.
  • for all constant strings instead of placing them in #define put the in a real array such as static char const V_PROTOCOL_VERSION = { "0" };. the size of such an string is a compile time constant that you can optain by (sizeof V_PROTOCOL_VERSION)-1.
  • for the output string, keep a pointer to the actual position to write
  • write the current string into that position and update your pointer with the known length of the string that you have written

This ensures that you touch all those constant strings exactly once per character that you copy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.