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Other empty objects in Python evaluate as False -- how can I get iterators/generators to do so as well?

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3 Answers 3

Guido doesn't want generators and iterators to behave that way.

Objects are true by default. They can be false only if they define __len__ that returns zero or __nonzero__ that returns False (the latter is called __bool__ in Py3.x).

You can add one of those methods to a custom iterator, but it doesn't match Guido's intent. He rejected adding __len__ to iterators where the upcoming length is known. That is how we got __length_hint__ instead.

So, the only way to tell if an iterator is empty is to call next() on it and see if it raises StopIteration.

On ASPN, I believe there are some recipes using this technique for lookahead wrapper. If a value is fetched, it is saved-up the an upcoming next() call.

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I am not suggesting that all iterators/generators should behave that way, only that sometimes it is useful for them to do so. For those times, my answer provides a way for it to happen. –  Ethan Furman Nov 2 '11 at 13:30
    
Guido suggested that no iterators/generators should ever behave that way. –  Raymond Hettinger Nov 2 '11 at 14:48
    
And one of the nice things about Python is that it doesn't (usually) stand in your way if you need/want to do something differently from the 'approved' method. (Don't get me started on sum()ing strs! ;) –  Ethan Furman Nov 2 '11 at 15:29
    
That's called "going against the grain" of the language. It means your iterators won't be usable in code that assumes bool(it) is always True. Guido was able to produce examples of such code including some that he had written. (Just because you can assign False,True=1,0 doesn't mean you should ;-) –  Raymond Hettinger Nov 2 '11 at 15:52
    
Indeed! Can you post a link to such code? I'm curious why one would bother checking the truth value of something that is always True. –  Ethan Furman Nov 2 '11 at 16:15

an 'empty thing' is automatically not an iterator. containers can be empty or not, and you can get iterators over the containers, but those iterators are not falsey when exhausted.

A good example of why iterators don't become falsey is sys.stdin. The problem with making sys.stdin falsey when it reaches the end of input is that there's no way of actually knowing if you have reached the end of such a stream without trying to consume input from it. The main reason for wanting an iterator to be falsey would be to 'peek' to see if getting the next item would be valid; but for sys.stdin, that's obviously not practical.

here's another example

(x for x in xrange(1000) if random.randrange(0, 2))

there's no way of knowing if this generator will return any more numbers without doing a bunch of work, you actually have to find out what the next value will be.

The solution is to just get the next value from the iterator. If it is empty, your loop will exit, or you'll get a StopIteration exception if you're not in a loop.

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An empty iterator is still an iterator, and while peeking is the main reason, it's not the only reason. Also, it's clunky to use StopIteration in a boolean test. –  Ethan Furman Nov 2 '11 at 13:56
1  
An iterator cannot be empty; only containers can be empty. Iterators are a 'place', like 'at the beginning', or 'column 5 of line 23'. –  IfLoop Nov 2 '11 at 14:31
    
I'll have to think about that. Even along those lines, though, my code can be thought of as True if not 'past the end', False otherwise. –  Ethan Furman Nov 2 '11 at 15:23
    
When you read from sys.stdin when ctrl-D has been pressed, the iterator will raise StopException as though it is empty, but the stream doesn't close, in fact, it effectively 'reopens', allowing further reading. There's no consistent concept of emptiness across all iterator types. The only feature is that is consistently available is next(), which may raise StopIteraton or not. –  IfLoop Nov 2 '11 at 15:53
    
You said 'StopException' -- did you mean StopIteration? Once StopIteration has been raised, it should keep being raised on further next() calls or the iterator is broken –  Ethan Furman Nov 2 '11 at 16:09
up vote 0 down vote accepted

By default all objects in Python evaluate as True. In order to support False evaluations the object's class must have either a __len__ method (0 == False), or a __nonzero__ method (False == False). Note: __nonzero__ ==> __bool__ in Python 3.x.

Because the iterator protocol is intentionally kept simple, and because there are many types of iterators/generators that aren't able to know if there are more values to produce before attempting to produce them, True/False evaluation is not part of the iterator protocol.

If you really want this behavior, you have to provide it yourself. One way is to wrap the generator/iterator in a class that provides the missing functionality.

Note that this code only evaluates to False after StopIteration has been raised.

As a bonus, this code works for pythons 2.4+

try:
    next
except NameError:       # doesn't show up until python 2.6
    def next(iter):
        return iter.next()

Empty = object()

class Boolean_Iterator(object):
    """Adds the abilities
    True/False tests:  True means there /may/ be items still remaining to be used
    """
    def __init__(self, iterator):
        try:
            self._iter = iter(iterator)
        except TypeError:
            self._iter = iter(iterator())
        self._alive = True
    def __iter__(self):
        return self
    def __next__(self):
        try:
            result = next(self._iter)
        except StopIteration:
            self._alive = False
            raise
        return result
    next = __next__                     # python 2.x
    def __bool__(self):
        return self._alive
    __nonzero__ = __bool__              # python 2.x

If you also want look-ahead (or peek) behavior, this code will do the trick (it evaluates to False before StopIteration is raised):

try:
    next
except NameError:       # doesn't show up until python 2.6
    def next(iter):
        return iter.next()

Empty = object()

class Iterator(object):
    """Adds the abilities
    True/False tests:  True means there are items still remaining to be used
    peek(): get the next item without removing it from the sequence
    """
    def __init__(self, iterator):
        try:
            self._iter = iter(iterator)
        except TypeError:
            self._iter = iter(iterator())
        self._peek = Empty
        self.peek()
    def __next__(self):
        peek, self._peek = self._peek, Empty
        self.peek()
        if peek is not Empty:
            return peek
        raise StopIteration
    next = __next__                     # python 2.x
    def __bool__(self):
        if self._peek is Empty:
            return False
        return True
    __nonzero__ = __bool__              # python 2.x
    def peek(self):
        if self._peek is not Empty:
            return self._peek
        try:
            self._peek = next(self._iter)
        except StopIteration:
            self._peek = Empty
        return self._peek

Keep in mind that peek behaviour is not appropriate when the timing of the underlying iterator/generator is relevant to its produced values.

Also keep in mind that third-party code, and possibly the stdlib, may rely on iterators/generators always evaluating to True. If you want peek without bool, remove the __nonzero__ and __bool__ methods.

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