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int *f, *l;

int main(){
    int *a;
    a = calloc(1, sizeof(int));
    f = l = a;
    put(&a, 1);
    put(&a, 3);
    put(&a, 2);
    _getch();
    return 0;
}

void put(int **a, int d){
    printf("--%d--", sizeof(*a));          //always == 4
    void *tmp = (int *)realloc(*a, sizeof(*a) + sizeof(int)); 
    if (temp)                              //allocated succesfully
        *a = temp;
    else
        printf("Allocating a failed");
    l++;
}

I trying to create a queue model based on int pointers.

I've corrected the sample a bit. But it still failed. Could you please help?

share|improve this question
    
tmp or temp? –  qrdl Nov 2 '11 at 10:23
    
You don't ever reference the parameter "d" ... ? Your code doesn't really do anything. Each realloc is the same size as the last and therefore won't do anything but return the original pointer. –  noelicus Nov 2 '11 at 11:28

7 Answers 7

a is an int pointer (int*), therefore its size if 4 bytes (on your machine) you should keep track of the size of allocated memory.

For example:

int *f, *l;

int main(){
    int *a;
    size_tasize = 0;
    a = calloc(1, sizeof(int));
    f = l = a;
    asize = sizeof(int);
    put(a, 1, &asize);
    put(a, 3, &asize);
    put(a, 2, &asize);
    _getch();
    return 0;
}

void put(int *a, int d, size_t * asize){
    printf("--%d--\n", asize);        //always == 4
    void *tmp = (int *)realloc(a, *asize + sizeof(int));
    (*asize) += 4;
    if (tmp)
        a = tmp;      //allocated succesfully
    else
        printf("Reallocating of 'a' size %d failed\n", asize);
    l++;
}
share|improve this answer

In C, there is no way to know the size of an array which is referenced by a pointer:

int a[25]; // Known size
int *b = a; // Unknown size

so the sizeof() just prints the size of the pointer which is 4 bytes on a 32bit platform.

If you need the size, allocate a structure like so:

struct Mem {
    int size;
    int a[1];
}

Use sizeof(struct Mem) + sizeof(int) * amount to determine how much memory to allocate, assign it to a pointer. Now you can use the memory with ptr->a[x].

Note that it will allocate a bit more memory that necessary (usually 4 bytes) but this approach works with different alignments, pointer sizes, etc.

share|improve this answer

sizeof(a) is the size of the pointer, not what a points to.

share|improve this answer

You are modifying the local variable a within the function, not the variable a in your main function. You either need to return the new value of a from put() or pass in a pointer to your pointer (int **a) to modify it.

For example:

int *put(int *a, int d);

int main(){
    int *a;
    a = calloc(1, sizeof(int));
    a = put(a, 1);
    ...
}

int *put(int *a, int d){
    void *tmp = (int *)realloc(a, sizeof(a) + sizeof(int));
    if (tmp)
        a = tmp;      //allocated succesfully
    else
        printf("Reallocating of 'a' size %d failed\n", sizeof(a));
    return a;
}

sizeof(a) will always return 4 in your case. It returns the size of the pointer, not the size of the memory allocated that the pointer is pointing to.

share|improve this answer

Instead of doing

if (tmp)
    a = tmp;

return tmp and assign it to a in main.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not enough; there is some data to be put in as well. –  glglgl Nov 2 '11 at 9:24

If you want to re-assign a new block to the pointer in a function other then one in which it has been defined , you have to pass a pointer to this pointer or return the newly allocated block and collect it into the same older block in caller function, as otherwise you'd be updating a copy.

share|improve this answer

The whole concept does not work the way you would it have to.

  • The sizeof a stuff does not work the way you intend to.
  • The reallocation itself is wrong, as you don't return the new address to the caller.
  • You have no information about the length of your data.

I would propose the following:

struct memblock {
    unsigned int alloced;
    unsigned int len;
    int * data;
}

// in order to prealloc
char add_realloc(struct memblock * mb, unsigned int add) {
    add += mb->alloced;
    int * tmp = realloc(mb->data, sizeof(*mb) + add * sizeof(*(mb->data)));
    if (!tmp) return 0;
    mb->data = tmp;
    mb->alloced = add;
    return 1;
}

char put(struct memblock * mb, int d) {
    if (mb->len == mb->alloced) {
        // realloc
        if (!add_realloc(mb, 1)) return 0;
    }
    mb->data[mb->len++] = d;
    return 1;
}

int main(){
    struct memblock a = {} // init with all zeros.
    // Calling realloc() with a NULL pointer is like malloc().

    // we put 3 values. Prealloc for not to have to realloc too often.
    if (add_realloc(&a, 3) {
        // now we are safe. Don't check the return values - it is guaranteed to be ok.
        put(&a, 1);
        put(&a, 3);
        put(&a, 2);
    }

    return 0;
}
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