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I have a string which contains the graph data something like this..

string sGraph = "0.05 /m 0.05 /m 0.05 /m 0.05 /m 0.05 /m 0.05 /m 0.05 /m 0.05....... 0.05 /m";

I have to extract the double value in a double[] or into a List for further processing. For ex. I use the

List<String> sGraphPoints = Regex.Split(sGraph, " /m").ToList<string>();

to retrieve the double values in a string list. I can then use each value from the string list for further processing. Is there an efficient way where i can do the same, instead of casting each string variable value into double as shown below...

double[] dGraphPoints = new double[sGraphPoints.Count];
            int i = 0;
            foreach (string str in sGraphPoints)
            {
                if (str != "")
                {
                    dGraphPoints[i] = double.Parse(str);
                }
                else 
                {
                    dGraphPoints[i] = 0.0;
                }

               i++;
            }

Many thanks in advance

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1  
Depends, do you need them as doubles or don't you? If you do, then you must convert the strings, naturally. Also, regex is unnecessary when you could simply use string.Split. –  Grant Thomas Nov 2 '11 at 10:49
1  
Why do you need an efficient way. This should be pretty fast already unless you're working with huge lists. An efficient way would be read the string till you find a /m and convert to data before the /m into a doube then read the next block untill you find a /m again etc. –  CodingBarfield Nov 2 '11 at 10:49
    
He really should use TryParse because Parse(str) will throw an exception if the string is not a number, to large of a number, ect. –  Ramhound Nov 2 '11 at 11:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
double[] dGraphPoints = sGraph.Split("/m")
                              .Select(s => s.Trim())
                              .Where(s => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                              .Select(s => Double.Parse(s))
                              .ToArray()

This is only slightly more 'efficient' because it's not using Regex and it's not creating an extra list in between.

But really, it comes down to what are you using the values for? You might be able to modify the where clause to only select values you're interested in, but I wouldn't know what those would be.

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2  
At which point does this become "efficient", in contrast to the existing solution? –  Grant Thomas Nov 2 '11 at 10:51
    
@Mr.Disappointment yeah I take your point. It's at least shorter :) –  Ray Nov 2 '11 at 10:52
    
Yes i do agree with @Ray that the above approach is shorter and more readable. –  this-Me Nov 2 '11 at 10:57
    
instead of your trim you could change the split to .Split("/m"," ") and S is never going to be null so you can compare to string.Empty –  Rune FS Nov 2 '11 at 11:10

Something like this;

public static IList<double> Parse(string text)
{
    List<double> list = new List<double>();
    if (text != null)
    {
        StringBuilder dbl = new StringBuilder(30); 
        for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++)
        {
            if (text[i] == 'm')
            {
                list.Add(double.Parse(dbl.ToString(), CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));
                dbl.Length = 0;
            }
            else
            {
                if ((text[i] != ' ') && (text[i] != '/'))
                {
                    dbl.Append(text[i]);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return list;
}

It does not use Regex, allocates only the needed array, and a fixed size StringBuilder. And if the text was provided as a TextReader instead of a string, you could change the returned IList into an IEnumerable, use yield instead of Add, and optimize memory consumption.

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