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I've seen this question and it was closed. So I'm sorry if this isn't allowed here, but this question is really bugging me, and I couldn't find a satisfying answer yet.

What are nowadays reasons to actually use a version control system (such as SVN). With cloud based file systems, couldn't you simply use that? Especially if in the case of a "collision" you can't depend on automatic file merging anyways?

I guess for bigger projects it becomes important to have a formal way of handling permissions etc. But what about smaller groups (of like 2-10 people)?

So to conclude this post full of questions: can anyone give any (practical) examples where dropbox doesn't fulfill version control correctly - and svn does?

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SVN is not a file system, so it makes no sense to compare it with one. SVN and DropBox are designed for different things in mind. Apples and oranges. –  Dialecticus Nov 2 '11 at 12:01
    
@Dialecticus While this may be truth strictly speaking. Whenever I said "dropbox" consider "dropbox' build in version control". –  paul23 Nov 2 '11 at 12:36
    
@paul23 'in the case of a "collision" you can't depend on automatic file merging anyways' this is so NOT true, I use automatic merge all the time. And svn (specially tortoisesvn) makes manual merge a very simple process. Have you ever used svn? –  yms Nov 2 '11 at 13:27
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Here are some reasons why Dropbox is not good for source control

  1. You see only changes but you don't see a changeset or the reason (e.g. bug fix, feature implementation). Every time you commit with a source control, you explain to others your intention of such changes.
  2. Flexible copying: in Dropbox, you cannot implement the concept of branching and merging without blowing up your space usage (and consequently everyone else in your team).
  3. You don't have unlimited history (although this is unlikely to be a big problem)
  4. You have little API hooks to work with, e.g. you want to run some validation on the code every time there is a new cpp file? You will have to resort to polling if you use Dropbox.
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DropBox and version control system (like SVN) are disigned for different purposes. Dropbox is mainly used for saving/sharing photos, documents, etc. With a version control tool, you can tracking histories of a file/project, share them with your team members, and a lot of more things to help you manage your source code, documents, etc.

Especially if in the case of a "collision" you can't depend on automatic file merging anyways?

Usually, a version control tool comes with a diff/merge tool which allows you to merge files automatically or mannually.

I guess for bigger projects it becomes important to have a formal way of handling permissions etc. But what about smaller groups (of like 2-10 people)?

It mainly depends on you. If you want all your team members to have the full control of all files under source control, it's not necessary for you to configure the permissions. Otherwise, like you don't someone edit files under a specific project, take advantage of security management in the system.

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