Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to accept only % symbol(optional) as a string variable with a number, as in input as percentage. E.G, 1000% or 100% or maybe 2000% or plain string input as 1000 or 2000.

Can we do it with help of a regular expression? or maybe some other validation.

Please help

share|improve this question
3  
Why not? Did you try anything? –  home Nov 2 '11 at 12:22
    
Are you receiving input via a Swing component? –  mre Nov 2 '11 at 12:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try the following regex

^[+-]?\d+(\.\d+)?%?$

Should work with decimals

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! worked... with some minor changes :) ^[0-9]?\\d+(\\,\\d+)?%?$ –  Alpesh003 Nov 2 '11 at 13:04
^[0-9]+%?$

assuming that at least one digit is required and only positive numbers (or 0) are allowed.

If you also want to allow decimals (you could have mentioned that in your question), try

^[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]+)?%?$

This allows any positive integer or decimal (but not abbreviated forms like .1 or 1.). Exponential notation is of course not supported.

share|improve this answer
    
i tried something like this [code]if(!manageAccountsPayableDto.getOsuus().matches("^(100(?:,0{1,2})?%?|0*?,\\‌​d{1,2}%?|\\d{1,2}(?:,\\d{1,2})?%?)$")) { errors.rejectValue("osuus", "","1065"); }[/code] –  Alpesh003 Nov 2 '11 at 12:23
    
@Alpesh003 So it didn't work? This is exactly the answer at your problem. +1 –  FailedDev Nov 2 '11 at 12:25
    
It seems to work perfect with patterns like 1000%, 100 but now problems with decimal values like 101.50 or 199.50% –  Alpesh003 Nov 2 '11 at 12:33

Absolutely. It sounds like you want to sanitize here as well, so "[0-9]{1,}%" or "[0-9]*.?[0-9]{1,}%" to ensure you match fractional percentages.

Normally I might have said, jfgi but this was too much (fun. EDIT)

http://www.regular-expressions.info/reference.html

You could do it with a something besides a regex but that would just be a loop that asserts that each character of input is a decimal digit, period, or percent sign, and that they are in the appropriate order.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Based on this comment :

it seems to work perfect with patterns like 1000%, 100 but now problems with decimal values like 101.50 or 199.50%

^[-+]?\d*\.?\d+\b%?$

Explanation :

"
^        # Assert position at the beginning of the string
[-+]     # Match a single character present in the list “-+”
   ?        # Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
[0-9]    # Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9”
   *        # Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
\.       # Match the character “.” literally
   ?        # Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
[0-9]    # Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9”
   +        # Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
\b       # Assert position at a word boundary
%        # Match the character “%” literally
   ?        # Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
\$        # Assert position at the end of the string (or before the line break at the end of the string, if any)
"

As a side note : You should really have been able to account for the optional part from @ Tim's answer. Take a look at the tutorial proposed by the other answers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanz a lot fot the explanation! –  Alpesh003 Nov 2 '11 at 13:05

You can try with the digits and % as an optional character.

^\d+(\.\d+)?%?$
share|improve this answer
    
It seems to work perfect with patterns like 1000%, 100 but now problems with decimal values like 101.50 or 199.50% –  Alpesh003 Nov 2 '11 at 12:32
    
updated for decimals. –  Jayendra Nov 2 '11 at 12:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.