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I'm trying to understand the script presented on this site:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

require ENV['TM_SUPPORT_PATH'] + '/lib/escape.rb'

def terminal_script_filepath
  %|tell application "Terminal"
      activate
      do script "jsc -i #{e_as(e_sh(ENV['TM_FILEPATH']))}"
    end tell|
end

open("|osascript", "w") { |io| io << terminal_script_filepath }

Most importantly, the part where the function terminal_script_filepath begins with:

%| …
… |

… and where it is "parsed" in:

{ |io| io << terminal_script_filepath }

Which concepts of Ruby are used here?

I know that open() with a pipe helps me feed input to the STDIN of a process, but how does the input get from terminal_script_filepath to io? I also know the basic % operations with strings, like %w, but what does the pipe do here?

share|improve this question
1  
+1 for googleable 'percent' 'pipe' – Kyle Heironimus Dec 27 '12 at 16:57
up vote 9 down vote accepted

It is a string. In ruby, you can define strings in may ways. Single or double quotes are the most common, %s is another. You can also define strings with any delimiter, as used in this script. For example %^Is also a string^, or %$Also a string$. You just have to make sure to not use those characters inside the string.

The << in this case is being used as a concatenation operation, appending the string to a file, or in this case, a pipe that listens to AppleScript.

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Be careful after Ruby 2.0 where modifiers can change the interpolation, e.g. %I[ ] Interpolated Array of symbols, separated by whitespace (after Ruby 2.0) – Josh Pinter Dec 10 '14 at 19:54

This is another example of string literal:

var = %|foobar|
var.class # => String

You can use any single non-alpha-numeric character as the delimiter, like so:

var = %^foobar^
var.class # => String
share|improve this answer
    
Where is this documented? – slhck Nov 2 '11 at 12:28
4  
en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/Syntax/Literals or 'The Ruby programming language' book by Flanagan and Matsumoto – WarHog Nov 2 '11 at 12:29
    
@WarHog And the link directly to the section: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/Syntax/… (I'd edit your comment if I could ;) – Josh Pinter Dec 10 '14 at 19:51
    
Also, be careful after Ruby 2.0 where modifiers can change the interpolation, e.g. %I[ ] Interpolated Array of symbols, separated by whitespace (after Ruby 2.0) – Josh Pinter Dec 10 '14 at 19:53

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