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I have a class in Java describing a parameter (name: Param) and another class in which I declare and initialize around 100 of such parameters as:


    private static final Param param_name_1 = new Param(x, y, z);

I would like to put all these objects/instances in an enum and initialize them there. What is the best method to do that?

===UPDATE===

I asked for the syntax of the enum but not like that.

I my case Param is another java class which has its own parameters, getters and setters and a constructor with the 3 parameters between the paranthesis:

public Param(intx, int y, int z){
this.x = x;
this.y = y;
this.z = z;
}

I my other class I declare and initialize 100 instances of the class Param as written above. Each x, y and z for each instance are different.

And the enum should contain the declaration of the instances and possibly also initialize them.

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3  
not clear what you are asking. About enum syntax? About copy-pasting your definitions? –  MK. Nov 2 '11 at 12:50

3 Answers 3

Assuming that you're asking about the enum syntax then you can do something like this (assuming that x, y and z are compile time constants).

 public enum Param {
    param_name_1(1,2,3),
    param_name_2(3,4,5);

    private int x;
    private int y;
    private int z;

    private Param(int x, int y, int z) {
       this.x=x;
       this.y=y;
       this.z=z;
    }
 }
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An enum is a special type of class, so you can declare constructors, fields and methods as well as implement interfaces. However, they can not extend other classes.

In this case, I'd suggest final fields and getters, like this:

public enum Param {

    PARAM_A(1, 2, 3), 
    PARAM_B(4, 5, 6), 
    PARAM_C(1, 3, 5);

    private final int x;
    private final int y;
    private final int z;

    private Param(int x, int y, int z) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }

    public int getX() {
        return x;
    }

    public int getY() {
        return y;
    }

    public int getZ() {
        return z;
    }
}
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if the fields are final you might as well make them public and access them directly –  ratchet freak Nov 2 '11 at 12:59
    
You could, but that reasoning would apply equally to all final fields of all classes, and that ain't the "java" way. Accessor methods are the industry standard. –  Bohemian Nov 2 '11 at 13:08
1  
They're not the just the industry standard. They are the wy to maintain encapsulation. If you change your mind and decide to represent the internal state in another way, or to make one of the fields computed from the others, you may keep the getters as is. –  JB Nizet Nov 2 '11 at 13:14

I think this is what you want

class Param
{
        private int x, y, z;
        public Param(int x, int y, int z)
        {
                this.x = x; this.y = y; this.z = z;
        }
}

public class t
{

        private enum ParamVals
        {
                VAL1(new Param(0,0,0)),
                VAL2(new Param(1,1,1));

                private Param paramVal;

                private ParamVals(Param paramVal)
                {
                        this.paramVal = paramVal;
                }

                public Param getVal()
                {
                        return paramVal;
                }
        }
}
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