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I'm trying to use a temp table in a table-valued function, but it seems I can not. Is there any other way I can use a temp table in a table-valued function?

CURRENT CODE:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.fnt_AllChildren (#ParentName VARCHAR(255))
  RETURNS @return_variable TABLE 
    (
        Id INT,
        Name VARCHAR(255),
        ParentId INT,
        ParentName VARCHAR(255)
    )
AS
BEGIN
    CREATE TABLE #Child (Id INT, Name VARCHAR(255), ParentId INT, ParentName VARCHAR(255))
    CREATE TABLE #Parent (Id INT, Name VARCHAR(255), ParentId INT, ParentName VARCHAR(255))


    INSERT #Child (Id, Name, ParentId, ParentName)
    SELECT child.Id, child.Name, child.ParentId, parent.Name
    FROM dbo.t_mytable child
    INNER JOIN dbo.t_mytable parent ON child.ParentId = parent.Id
    WHERE parent.Name = #ParentName

    WHILE (@@ROWCOUNT > 0)
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO @return_variable
        SELECT * FROM #Child

        DELETE FROM#Parent

        INSERT INTO #Parent
        SELECT * FROM #Child

        DELETE FROM #Child

        INSERT INTO #Child (Id, Name, ParentId, ParentName)
        SELECT child.Id, child.Name, child.ParentId, parent.Name
        FROM dbo.t_mytable child
        INNER JOIN #Parent parent ON child.ParentId = parent.Id
    END
    RETURN
END
GO
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2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can use a table variable instead.

DECLARE @Child TABLE (Id INT, Name VARCHAR(255), ParentId INT, ParentName VARCHAR(255))
DECLARE @Parent TABLE (Id INT, Name VARCHAR(255), ParentId INT, ParentName VARCHAR(255))
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No.

You can use @table_variables though. Although from a quick glance maybe a recursive CTE might work for you rather than using these child/parent tables at all.

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