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class Program
{


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        //Period 01 2008, Period 02 2008
        Series s1 = new Series { Text = "Period 01 2008", Value = "1"};
        Series s2 = new Series { Text = "Period 02 2008", Value = "2" };
        Series s3 = new Series { Text = "Period 03 2008", Value = "3" };

        Series s11 = new Series { Text = "Period 01 2009", Value = "1" };
        Series s21 = new Series { Text = "Period 02 2009", Value = "2" };
        Series s31 = new Series { Text = "Period 03 2009", Value = "3" };

        Series s12 = new Series { Text = "Period 01 2010", Value = "1" };
        Series s22 = new Series { Text = "Period 02 2010", Value = "2" };
        Series s32 = new Series { Text = "Period 03 2010", Value = "3" };

        List<Series> series = new List<Series> { s21, s31, s1, s12, s11, s2, s22, s3, s32 };


       // mySeries.ForEach(i => Console.WriteLine("Period {0} {1}",i.Period, i.Year));
        series.ForEach(i => Console.WriteLine(i.Text));

        Console.WriteLine("************************");

        series.OrderBy(i => i.Text);

        series.ForEach(i=> Console.WriteLine(i.Text));

    }

}


public class Series
{
    public string Text { get; set; }
    public string Value {get;set;}
}

Basically I want my list to be ordered by the Text property of the Series class. I have a work-around by splitting the text, but I am looking for any other way - using IComparer maybe?

The ordered list should be something like this:

Period 01 2008, Period 02 2008, Period 03 2008, Period 01 2009, Period 02 2009...

Update: the definition of the Series class cannot be changed.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Add following comparer

public class SeriesTextComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        string[] xparts = x.Split(' ');
        string[] yparts = y.Split(' ');

        if (xparts[2] == yparts[2])
        {
            if (Convert.ToInt32(xparts[1]) > Convert.ToInt32(yparts[1]))
            {
                return 1;
            }
            else if(Convert.ToInt32(xparts[1]) < Convert.ToInt32(yparts[1]))
            { 
                return -1;
            }
            else
            {
                return 0;
            }
        }
        else
        { 
        if (Convert.ToInt32(xparts[2]) > Convert.ToInt32(yparts[2]))
            {
                return 1;
            }
            else if(Convert.ToInt32(xparts[2]) < Convert.ToInt32(yparts[2]))
            { 
                return -1;
            }
            else
            {
                return 0;
            }
        }
    }
}

And change last two lines in your example as below

List<Series> sortedSeries =  series.OrderBy(i => i.Text, new SeriesTextComparer()).ToList();
sortedSeries.ForEach(i => Console.WriteLine(i.Text));
share|improve this answer
    
I'm assuming that you are always going to have month and year numbers in position 2 and 3. Hence no error checks in my code. You can add error checks if you want – Suhas Nov 2 '11 at 13:25
    
Thanks alot this is what I have been expecting. yes years and period will always will be in that position – Pavan Josyula Nov 2 '11 at 14:16
    
@pavan-josyula if this solves your problem then may be you can accept the asnwer – Suhas Nov 2 '11 at 15:11

The LINQ OrderBy extension method returns a new sorted sequence, which you aren't doing anything with.
It doesn't modify the original list.

Instead, you can call List<T>.Sort, which is an in-place sort that mutates the List<T> instance:

series.Sort((a, b) => a.Text.CompareTo(b.Text));
share|improve this answer
    
yea I see what you mean after chaging that line to this series = series.OrderBy(i=>i.Text).ToList(); I am geting output like this Period 02 2009 Period 03 2009 Period 01 2008 Period 01 2010 Period 01 2009 Period 02 2008 Period 02 2010 Period 03 2008 Period 03 2010 ************************ Period 01 2008 Period 01 2009 Period 01 2010 Period 02 2008 Period 02 2009 Period 02 2010 Period 03 2008 Period 03 2009 Period 03 2010 Press any key to continue . . . by I am looking for some thing like this Period 01 2008 Period 02 2008 Period 03 2008 – Pavan Josyula Nov 2 '11 at 13:11
1  
You need to write a different comparer. – SLaks Nov 2 '11 at 13:16

Update second last line in main method to:

series = series.OrderBy(i => i.Text).ToList();

Happy coding

share|improve this answer
    
This is how Iam getting ************************ Period 01 2008 Period 01 2009 Period 01 2010 Period 02 2008 Period 02 2009 Period 02 2010 Period 03 2008 Period 03 2009 Period 03 2010 Press any key to continue . . . but I am looking for Period 01 2008, Period 02 2008, Period 03 2008,Period 01 2009, Period 02 2009 and so on – Pavan Josyula Nov 2 '11 at 13:16
    
I see what you mean, you need to modify last line like: series.ForEach(i=> Console.WriteLine(i.Text)+","); isn't it – Prashant Lakhlani Nov 2 '11 at 13:28

I would add a DateTime property

Series s1 = new Series { 
    Text = "Period 01 2008", 
    Value = "1", 
    PeriodStart = new DateTime(2008, 01, 01) 
};

and order by it:

series.OrderBy(i => i.PeriodStart).ForEach(i => Console.WriteLine(i.Text));

so you don't get all Januaries together.

Also, your sorting won't be affected by any changes to Text property, which seams to be for display purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 ForEach is on List<T> so it doesn't compile. Changes to Text likely need to affect sort, and although unstated, the OP cannot change the Series class definition. ToList on the OrderBy will fix your example. – Adam Houldsworth Nov 2 '11 at 13:56

Although I wouldn't do this myself, this works:

var sorted = series.OrderBy(s => s.Text.Split(' ')[2].Trim()).ThenBy(s => s.Text.Split(' ')[1].Trim());

This demonstrates the type of LINQ needed to do the sorting. I haven't done so here, but you will need to be more defensive around null/missing string parts.

Alternatively

A slightly different way to tackle the problem is to wrap the Series class and expose more useful properties (disclaimer, better parsing code required!):

class BetterSeries
{
    public int Quarter {get;set;}
    public int Year {get;set;}
    public Series InnerSeries {get;private set;}

    public BetterSeries(Series s)
    {
        string[] parts = s.Text.Split(' ');
        Quarter = int.Parse(parts[1].Trim());
        Year = int.Parse(parts[2].Trim());
        InnerSeries = s;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("Period {0} {1}", Quarter, Year);
    }
}

This will then let you sort a little more simply:

var sorted = series.OrderBy(s => s.Year).ThenBy(s => s.Quarter);

It also means you aren't encoding information into the formatted output of the data, you store the data itself and then add code to format the output.

share|improve this answer
    
but the problem is I cant change the class definition. The text always comes in this format "Period 01 YYYY". I need to sort it by period number and then by year – Pavan Josyula Nov 2 '11 at 13:19
    
-1 - I believe you will have problems with order preservation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb534966.aspx – Jakub Konecki Nov 2 '11 at 13:20
    
@JakubKonecki Where does that link mention preservation? I actually tried this code in a console app and it works fine. – Adam Houldsworth Nov 2 '11 at 13:21
    
@AdamHouldsworth would u please share the output once – Pavan Josyula Nov 2 '11 at 13:23
1  
@PavanJosyula The output is the same as what you are expecting, but you just commented that you cannot change the series definition. The only way you are going to get to sort it correctly is if either alphabetical sorting does the trick, or you break the string down into parts. – Adam Houldsworth Nov 2 '11 at 13:25

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