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I have got the following, but its not quite what I need now - It returns the dates of all the Fridays for the month passed in.

    public static IEnumerable<DateTime> ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(DateTime dt, DayOfWeek weekday, int amounttoshow = 4)
    {
        var days =
            Enumerable.Range(1, DateTime.DaysInMonth(dt.Year, dt.Month)).Select(
                day => new DateTime(dt.Year, dt.Month, day));

        var weekdays = from day in days
                       where day.DayOfWeek == weekday
                       orderby day.Day ascending
                       select day;

        return weekdays.Take(amounttoshow);
    }

HOWEVER I now want to return the next Nth Fridays dates from todays date, irrelavant of the month they are in.

And I'm a bit stuck... Any help greatly appreciated.

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1  
Did you see this? –  m0skit0 Nov 2 '11 at 13:30
2  
Stupid question, but why don't you just 1) Determine the next friday 2) Add 7 days to that via the add method N -1 times, placing your answers into a List<DateTime>? This seems like an odd use of LINQ to me. –  JSWork Nov 2 '11 at 13:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public static IEnumerable<DateTime> ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(DateTime dt, DayOfWeek weekday, int amounttoshow = 4)
{
    // Find the first future occurance of the day.
    while(dt.DayOfWeek != weekday)
        dt = dt.AddDays(1);

    // Create the entire range of dates required. 
    return Enumerable.Range(0, amounttoshow).Select(i => dt.AddDays(i * 7));
}

This first looks for the next day matching weekday then proceeds to create amounttoshow DateTime instances each of which is 7 days further than the previous, starting at the found date.

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No need to bother with LINQ:

public static IEnumerable<DateTime> ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(DateTime dt, DayOfWeek weekday, int amounttoshow = 4)
{
    while(dt.DayOfWeek != weekday)
        dt = dt.AddDays(1);

    for (int i = 0; i < amounttoshow; i++)
    {
        yield return dt;
        dt = dt.AddDays(7);
    }
}
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1  
var day = dt.DayOfWeek == weekday ? dt : dt.AddDays(weekday - dt.DayOfWeek); is wrong. 1) Weekday can be greater than dt.DayOfWeek. This will cause you to return the wrong result 2) The equals check is pointless. if weekday == dt.DayOfWeek is true you'll just be adding 0 days. –  JSWork Nov 2 '11 at 13:46
    
I think you will suffer the same problem as my original answer (see my comments) –  musefan Nov 2 '11 at 13:47
    
@musefan indeed you are correct. I'll modify the start condition when I get back to a computer but the rest of the logic should be fine –  Isak Savo Nov 2 '11 at 14:09
    
I believe this is the best solution with minor update - remove day variable and use the dt directly: while (dt.DayOfWeek != dayofWeek) { dt = dt.AddDays(1); } ... –  Yuriy Rozhovetskiy Nov 2 '11 at 14:14

A higher-speed alternative (arithmetic instead of a search loop for the first date, and moving the expensive multiplication outside the loop):

public static IEnumerable<DateTime> ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(DateTime dt, 
    DayOfWeek weekday, int amounttoshow = 4)
{
    var day = dt.AddDays(weekday > dt.DayOfWeek 
        ? weekday - dt.DayOfWeek
        : 7 - weekday - dt.DayOfWeek);
    var days = new List<DateTime>();
    for(var until = day.AddDays(7 * amounttoshow); 
        day < until; 
        day = day.AddDays(7))
        days.Add(day);
    return days.ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer

Try this

public static IEnumerable<DateTime> ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(DateTime dt, DayOfWeek weekday, int amounttoshow = 4)
  {
     // get the difference from the weekday
     int diff = dt.DayOfWeek - weekday;

     // amounttoshow * 7 is the number of days in a week (28 to get 4 weeks)
     var days =
         Enumerable.Range(1, amounttoshow * 7 + diff).Select(            
             day => DayOfYear(dt, day));

     var weekdays = from day in days
                    where day.DayOfWeek == weekday
                    orderby day.Day ascending
                    select day;

     return weekdays.Take(amounttoshow);
  }

  // returns the day in datetime
  public static DateTime DayOfYear(DateTime dt, int day)
  {
     DateTime firstDayOfYear = new DateTime(dt.Year, 1, 1);
     DateTime dateTime = firstDayOfYear.AddDays(dt.DayOfYear - 1 + day);

     return dateTime;
  }

To get a value

DateTime d = new DateTime(2011, 11, 5);
IEnumerable<DateTime> ie = ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(d, DayOfWeek.Friday, 4);

System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(ie.First().ToString());
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Taught you wanted to use the query... –  Khan Nov 2 '11 at 14:49

replace the complete method body with

return (from z in Enumerable.Range (0, amounttoshow) 
let b = (from x in Enumerable.Range (0, 6) where DateTime.Now.AddDays (x).DayOfWeek == weekday select DateTime.Now.AddDays (x)).First() 
select b.AddDays (z * 7));
share|improve this answer

What about trying this...

    public static List<DateTime> ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(DateTime dt, DayOfWeek weekday, int amounttoshow = 4)
    {
        List<DateTime> list = new List<DateTime>();

        dt = dt.AddDays(weekday - dt.DayOfWeek);//set to the first day in the list

        if (weekday <= dt.DayOfWeek)
            dt = dt.AddDays(7);

        for (int i = 0; i < amounttoshow; i++)
        {
            list.Add(dt);
            dt = dt.AddDays(7);
        }

        return list;
    }

Note that as it stands, if you pass in the current day then the first date in the list will be next week and not today. If you want today to be included as the first date in this instance you can using the following code instead....

    public static IEnumerable<DateTime> ReturnNextNthWeekdaysOfMonth(DateTime dt, DayOfWeek weekday, int amounttoshow = 4)
    {
        List<DateTime> list = new List<DateTime>();

        if (weekday < dt.DayOfWeek)
            dt = dt.AddDays(7);

        dt = dt.AddDays(weekday - dt.DayOfWeek);

        for (int i = 0; i < amounttoshow; i++)
        {
            list.Add(dt);
            dt = dt.AddDays(7);
        }

        return list;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
This wouldn't work for say any day that's before the current day of the week. I.e. if I were to ask for the next 2 Tuesday, the first result right now would be the tuesday just past beacuse of dt = dt.AddDays(weekday - dt.DayOfWeek); –  J.Kommer Nov 2 '11 at 13:39
    
@J.Kommer: Great spot thanks, have updated code to fix... possible optimisation to follow ;) –  musefan Nov 2 '11 at 13:43
1  
Still bad. Do the if check first and make < instead of <=. Edit: (Bad assuming you want to include the current day if it is the right "DayOfWeek" to start with) –  JSWork Nov 2 '11 at 13:51
    
@JSWork: Cheers, provided the extra info in the answer –  musefan Nov 2 '11 at 14:01

Change last line to

return weekdays.Where((x, i) => i % N == 0);
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