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I need to write a generic method in the base class that would accept 2 objects as parameters and compares them for equality.

Ex:

public abstract class BaseData
{

  public bool AreEqual(object O1, object O2)
  {
    //Need to implement this
  }
}

public class DataTypeOne : BaseData
{
  public string Name;
  public string Address;
}

public class DataTypeTwo : BaseData
{
  public int CustId;
  public string CustName;
}

The AreEqual() method would accept 2 instances of DataTypeOne or 2 instances of DataTypeTwo.

My guess is I need to use Reflection? I can use LINQ if it can be more readable/concise.

EDIT: The reason I would like to implement this method in the base class is because of project restrictions. There are a large number of devs working on the derived classes. By implementing this in the base class, I am trying to have 1 less thing for them to worry about.

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Why don't you override Object.Equals? –  Paco Apr 28 '09 at 14:05
    
Why do you need to implement AreEqual in the base class (and why without generics)? If AreEqual is abstract and DataTypeOne and DataTypeTwo implements AreEqual then this is a more cleaner solution. So in short: what's the reason for the common AreEqual method? –  boj Apr 28 '09 at 14:07
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7 Answers

(Assuming that what you want is to compare all the fields of the two objects for equality.)

Usually, you wouldn't bother using reflection for this, you'd just compare each field yourself. The IEquatable<T> interface exists for this purpose, and you also might want to override Object.Equals() on the types in question. For example:

public class DataTypeTwo : BaseData, IEquatable<DataTypeTwo>
{
    public int CustId;
    public string CustName;

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return CustId ^ CustName.GetHashCode(); // or whatever
    }

    public override bool Equals(object other)
    {
        return this.Equals(other as DataTypeTwo);
    }

    public bool Equals(DataTypeTwo other)
    {
        return (other != null &&
                other.CustId == this.CustId &&
                other.CustName == this.CustName);
    }
}

Also, consider whether or not your type makes sense as a struct instead. Value types automatically compare equality by doing a field-by-field comparison.

Note that by overriding Equals, you basically achieve what (it seems to me) you're trying to achieve with your "master equals method" scheme. That is, people using DataTypeTwo will be able to naturally test for equality without having to know anything special about your API -- they'll just use Equals like they would with other things.

EDIT: Thanks to Jared for reminding me about GetHashCode. You'll also want to override it to maintain normal-looking behavior in hashtables by making sure that any two objects which are "equal" also return the same hash code.

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1  
You still need ot override GetHashCode –  JaredPar Apr 28 '09 at 14:06
    
Why you need GetHashCode, Equals not sufficient? –  Ahmed Said Apr 29 '09 at 6:15
    
Please never change a class to a struct for the sole sake of changing the Equality comparison behaviour. Tiny data types like Cartesian co-ordinates which are expected to behave in a certain "by value" way are fine; but data structures that another programmer will assume to be a class should not be made into structs for compare by value - you will also invisibly change behaviour wrt. initialisation and (most importantly) assignment. –  perfectionist Sep 2 '13 at 9:53
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Here's what I came up with using reflection. Hope it helps.

public bool AreEqual(object obj)
    {
        bool returnVal = true;

        if (this.GetType() == obj.GetType())
        {
            FieldInfo[] fields = this.GetType().GetFields(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public);

            foreach (FieldInfo field in fields)
            {
                if(field.GetValue(this) != field.GetValue(obj))
                {
                    returnVal = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        else
            returnVal = false;

        return returnVal;
    }
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Thanks Crispy, that was exactly what I was looking for! –  Lanceomagnifico Jan 3 at 7:53
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Don't do it. Inheritance is the way to go and each class, should override the Equal and GetHashCode where needed.

Maybe you'll get some work done out of those developers now but I'll come back to bite you in the ass in the future when the product needs to be maintained.

Seriously, just try to find another way to help.

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+1, sometimes the only correct answer to "How?" is "Don't". –  jwg Mar 12 '13 at 12:03
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I would probably do something like this:

public abstract class BaseData : IEquatable<BaseData>
{
    public abstract bool Equals(BaseData other);
}

public class DataTypeOne : BaseData
{
    public string Name;
    public string Address;

    public override bool Equals(BaseData other)
    {
        var o = other as DataTypeOne;
        if(o == null)
            return false;
        return Name.Equals(o.Name) && Address.Equals(o.Address);
    }
}

public class DataTypeTwo : BaseData
{
    public int CustId;
    public string CustName;

    public override bool Equals(BaseData other)
    {
        var o = other as DataTypeTwo;
        if (o == null)
            return false;
        return CustId == o.CustId && CustName.Equals(o.CustName);
    }
}
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Perhaps an explanation as to why it's "insane" would be nice. –  madcolor Apr 28 '09 at 14:22
    
Well, I just think it is really no need of comparing DataTypeOne and DataTypeTwo, since they will never be equal. In other words I would probably just implement IEquatable<DataTypeOne> in DataTypeOne and/or IEquatable<DataTypeTwo> in DataTypeTwo. Or most likely I would just use linq or something to i.e. look for a particlar DataTypeTwo with a particular CustId for example and not bother with the IEquatable or override Equals or anything like that. –  Svish Apr 29 '09 at 6:01
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Yes, you will have to use reflection, because the base class knows nothing about derived classes. But why do you want to implement that function in the base class? Why not in the derived classes?

Further there is a standard way to do this by overriding Object.GetHashCode() and Object.Equals().

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I have a class that I created that will compare the differences between two objects.

http://comparenetobjects.codeplex.com/

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public void CompareTwoObjects()
{
    try {   
        byte[] btArray = ObjectToByteArray(object1);   //object1 is you custom object1
        byte[] btArray2 = ObjectToByteArray(object2); //object2 is you custom object2
        bool result = ByteArrayCompare(btArray, btArray2);
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        throw ex;
    }
}

public byte[] ObjectToByteArray(object _Object)
{
    try {
        // create new memory stream
        System.IO.MemoryStream _MemoryStream = new System.IO.MemoryStream();

        // create new BinaryFormatter
        System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter _BinaryFormatter
            = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();

        // Serializes an object, or graph of connected objects, to the given stream.
        _BinaryFormatter.Serialize(_MemoryStream, _Object);

        // convert stream to byte array and return
        return _MemoryStream.ToArray();
    } catch (Exception _Exception) {
        // Error
        Console.WriteLine("Exception caught in process: {0}", _Exception.ToString());
    }

    // Error occured, return null
    return null;
}

public bool ByteArrayCompare(byte[] a1, byte[] a2)
{
    if (a1.Length != a2.Length)
        return false;

    for (int i = 0; i < a1.Length; i++)
        if (a1[i] != a2[i])
            return false;

    return true;
}
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1  
Thanks for posting an answer! While a code snippet could answer the question it's still great to add some addition information around, like explain, etc .. –  j0k Sep 23 '12 at 9:56
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