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I'm writing a Python parser to learn Flex and Bison, and I'm trying to find out why only the first of these programs is valid Python.

a.py:

\
# This is valid Python

produces no error.

b.py:

    \
# This is not valid Python

produces this error:

  File "b.py", line 1
    \
    ^
IndentationError: unexpected indent

and c.py:

if True:
    pass
    \
    # This is not valid Python

produces this error:

  File "c.py", line 4
    # This is not valid Python
                             ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

I'm using Python 2.6.5 (r265:79063, Apr 16 2010, 13:09:56) [GCC 4.4.3] on linux2 (Ubuntu 10.04); However, testing on ideone.com suggests the behavior is the same on Python 3.

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1  
Why would you want to do this? –  Will Nov 2 '11 at 14:14
3  
ask yourself, why am I performing a line continuation on a blank line before a comment? –  KevinDTimm Nov 2 '11 at 14:16
1  
@Will it's not so much that I want to write code this way, but I'm writing a Python parser to learn flex+bison, and I'd like to know why this isn't valid. –  nandhp Nov 2 '11 at 14:19
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's an implementation detail.

Here's how a few different implementations respond to your code:

                 a.py  b.py  c.py    
                 ----  ----  ----
CPython 2.6.5     ok    bad   bad
CPython 3.?       ok    bad   bad
Jython 2.2.1      ok    ok    bad
Jython 2.5.2      bad   bad   bad
IronPython 2.7.1  ok    bad   ok

My reading of the Exlplicit Line Joining section of the Python Language Reference is that all three examples could be treated as valid:

Two or more physical lines may be joined into logical lines using backslash characters (\), as follows: when a physical line ends in a backslash that is not part of a string literal or comment, it is joined with the following forming a single logical line, deleting the backslash and the following end-of-line character.

If CPython were changed to accept all three examples as valid I doubt it would be noticed by its users, change the character of the language, or break any code.

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@agf: Perhaps I should have made a shorter quote, but I wanted to provide context for my reading of this key sentence: "when a physical line ends in a backslash that is not part of a string literal or comment, it is joined with the following forming a single logical line, deleting the backslash and the following end-of-line character." If we apply this rule to the example code all of those constructs should be acceptable. But they're not, so I suppose it is an implementation detail. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 2 '11 at 14:51
1  
I think the idea is that the line continuation character makes the line not just whitespace any more -- there is something on the line, so the laxness applied to whitespace / comment lines doesn't occur. See my answer. –  agf Nov 2 '11 at 14:58
    
Interesting. Jython 2.2.1 accepts a and b, but not c. However, Jython 2.5.2 doesn't accept any of them (although it will accept a if I add a subsequent statement, but not b or c). –  nandhp Nov 2 '11 at 14:59
2  
I just checked IronPython 2.7. It accepts a.py and c.py. It chokes on b.py, giving SyntaxError: invalid syntax rather than the IndentationError given by CPython. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 2 '11 at 15:22
1  
Nice follow-up. –  agf Nov 2 '11 at 16:09
show 2 more comments

Steven's quote is relevant, but it still doesn't directly explain this situation.

I think the key insight is that a line continuation character makes Python treat a line as not just whitespace.

  • a.py: It seems like it's treating the first line as whitespace. It's not; once the line continuation character is reached, it and the newline are removed, and so since there is nothing else on that line it doesn't exist for the purposes of parsing -- you just have a single line with a comment. Note: Jython 2.5.2 treats this basically as expected; valid Python code is expected on a later line.

  • b.py: Never makes it to the comment, as soon as the line continuation character is reached, and the line is not just whitespace any more, the indentation becomes an error.

  • c.py: The comment is again irrelevant, you'll get the same error with any amount of whitespace and / or a comment on the next line. You need to have actual Python code on the line following the line continuation character.

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\ can join, EOL, EOF

So this works

\
# This is valid Python

but here

if True:
    \
    # This is not valid Python

after \ the parser is looking for an indented line, which doesn't exist.

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1  
Except the first works even without EOF after it (other lines following) and the second doesn't work even with another indented line after the whitespace / comment line. Also note the error in the second is SyntaxError not IndentationError. –  agf Nov 2 '11 at 15:05
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Guido regularly reminds in his blog and mail posts that he wants to keep the implementation of the Python parser as simple as possible.

I don't think this is an intended behavior, I think it's a side effect of having a strict and simple syntaxe. Some stuff are just not allowed, and no one cared to check if they were because it doesn't matter.

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2  
It may or may not be intended behavior, but it is explainable behavior. Also I'm not sure there is any evidence the decision to keep it an LL(1) parser is relevant. –  agf Nov 2 '11 at 15:09
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