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After troubleshooting a strange error, I encountered this:

echo strtotime("2050/09/19");

returns false

Why?

Thanks!

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There are two separate notes (more in the comments) on the php.net/strtotime page regarding this behavior. Not to be that 'RTFM guy' but when I find myself wondering about the return value of a php function the first thing I check is the manual, specifically the return value section and any notes about odd failures. –  Mike B Nov 2 '11 at 15:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is because of the fact year 2050 is not in the 32-bit Unix epoch (which ends somewhere in 2038). See more on the documentation page for strtotime().

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I missed that on the page.. to say I even checked, is there any workaround for that? –  0plus1 Nov 2 '11 at 15:18
1  
@0plus1: switch to a 64bit system, which has a 64bit time_t and allows MUCH MUCH larger dates. –  Marc B Nov 2 '11 at 15:23
1  
@0plus1: Various workarounds, depending on what you want to achieve. But the best solution is switching into 64bit system. 32bit system has smaller range of integers available, and result of strtotime() is returned as integer (if correctly called). Thus you would not need to make any gimmicks to work with dates out of the range I mentioned. –  Tadeck Nov 2 '11 at 15:51

On a 32-bit system it can't handle dates that far in the future: strtotime

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Looks like you don't have a 64 bit PHP. From the strtotime docs:

Note:

The valid range of a timestamp is typically from Fri, 13 Dec 1901 20:45:54 UTC to Tue, 19 Jan 2038 03:14:07 UTC. (These are the dates that correspond to the minimum and maximum values for a 32-bit signed integer.) Additionally, not all platforms support negative timestamps, therefore your date range may be limited to no earlier than the Unix epoch. This means that e.g. dates prior to Jan 1, 1970 will not work on Windows, some Linux distributions, and a few other operating systems. PHP 5.1.0 and newer versions overcome this limitation though.

For 64-bit versions of PHP, the valid range of a timestamp is effectively infinite, as 64 bits can represent approximately 293 billion years in either direction.

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The valid range of a timestamp is typically from Fri, 13 Dec 1901 20:45:54 UTC to Tue, 19 Jan 2038 03:14:07 UTC. (These are the dates that correspond to the minimum and maximum values for a 32-bit signed integer.) Additionally, not all platforms support negative timestamps, therefore your date range may be limited to no earlier than the Unix epoch. This means that e.g. dates prior to Jan 1, 1970 will not work on Windows, some Linux distributions, and a few other operating systems. PHP 5.1.0 and newer versions overcome this limitation though.

For 64-bit versions of PHP, the valid range of a timestamp is effectively infinite, as 64 bits can represent approximately 293 billion years in either direction.

Here.

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