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I've got a class with generics which uses another class, which in return needs to know what instance of the initial class "owns" it - which causes problems ;) Let me give an example:

public interface IFoo<T>
{
}

public interface IBar
{
    IFoo<IBar> Foo { get; set; }
}

public class Foo<T> : IFoo<T> where T : IBar, new()
{
    private readonly T _bar;
    public Foo()
    {
        _bar = new T {Foo = this};
    }
}

class Bar : IBar
{
    public IFoo<IBar> Foo { get; set; }
}

This doesn't work as Foo = this doesn't work - even if I try to cast this to IFoo (compiles but fails at run time). I've tried to tweak the code various ways, but I've not found an implementation that works...

Hopefully you see what I'm trying to do, and perhaps you even see how I can achieve this ;-)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can solve this with a combination of an explicit cast in the constructor, along with c#4.0 support for covariance on generic parameters.

First, you need to insert a cast in the Foo<T> constructor:

_bar = new T {Foo = (IFoo<IBar>)this};

Just doing that isn't sufficient, though. Your constraint that T : new() means that T needs to be a concrete class. As such, IFoo<T> will never be exactly IFoo<IBar>. However, if you specify that the generic parameter T for IBar<T> is covariant, then the cast from IFoo<Bar> to IFoo<IBar> will become legal:

public interface IFoo<out T>

The out keyword specifies that the parameter is covariant (which essentially means "this parameter will only be output by methods, never input.")

This MSDN article offers more details on covariance and contravariance.

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That did the trick! Fixed a problem AND learnt something new. Not bad :) Thanks! –  Chris Ridge Nov 3 '11 at 8:59

Would declaring the T type parameter of IFoo as covariant solve your problem?
This code should allow you to do what you are trying:

public interface IFoo<out T> {
}

public interface IBar {
    IFoo<IBar> Foo { get; set; }
}

public class Foo<T> : IFoo<T> where T : IBar, new() {
    private readonly T _bar;
    public Foo() {
        _bar = new T { Foo = (IFoo<IBar>)this };
    }
}

class Bar : IBar {
    public IFoo<IBar> Foo { get; set; }
}

public static class Program {

    public static void Main(params string[] args) {
        Bar b = new Bar();
        Foo<Bar> f = new Foo<Bar>();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Worked a charm :) –  Chris Ridge Nov 3 '11 at 9:00

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