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I have the following part of a program, which emulates a very basic menu.

while (true) {
    int selection;
    try {
        selection = scanner.nextInt();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        selection = -1;
    }
    switch (selection) {
    case 0:
        System.exit(0);
    default:
        System.out.println("No valid selection!");
    }
}

Now, whenever I enter not an integer, the selection is set to -1 and the error message is printed. However, the loop continues endlessly, with the Scanner not waiting for any input.

How do I tell it to wait again? How do I fail more gracefully on malformed user input here?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When a Scanner fails to read something, the offending data is not removed from the stream, which means any subsequent read will fail again until the data is cleared.

To fix this, you could, on failure, just read something and ignore the result:

try {
    selection = scanner.nextInt();
} catch (Exception e) {
    selection = -1;
    scanner.next(); // discard the input
}
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Not sure throwing and catching an exception is relevant in your case.

Try:

boolean isValid = false;
int selection;
while(!isValid) {
    isValid = scanner.hasNextInt();
    if(!isValid) {
        System.out.println("No valid selection!");
        scanner.next();
    } else {
        selection = scanner.nextInt();
    }
}
if(selection == 0) {
    System.exit(0);
}
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1  
This is a fairly decent approach, except for your cheesy isInteger() method ;) Integer.parseInt(String i) does this for you, and throws an exception if it's not an integer. (which is exactly what is happening when using scanner.nextInt() ... ) –  Brian Roach Nov 2 '11 at 16:47
    
I know, but Integer.parseInt should not be used to test if a String is an int ;-) Anyway one is free to implement that isInteger method the way he wants :) –  Jean Logeart Nov 2 '11 at 16:52
    
Java would seem to disagree with you as that's exactly what Scanner does. (I personally agree, as does Josh Bloch, that exceptions should only be used for exceptional conditions). The point I was trying to make, however, is that the convention is that if you're expecting an int, use nextInt() and catch the exception (discarding the token with next() in the catch). Even better, you can use hasNextInt() avoiding the exception handling entirely. There's simply no reason to write your own implementation of anything here. –  Brian Roach Nov 2 '11 at 16:55
    
Agreed on the hasNextInt method. It actually is more elegant ;) –  Jean Logeart Nov 2 '11 at 16:58

Make some user input exit out/break the while loop. Like if a user enters "Exit" while loop stops.

Besides that you can do something like:

catch (Exception e) {
    selection = -1;
}
switch (selection) {
case 0:
    System.exit(0);
default:
    System.out.println("No valid selection!");
    System.out.println("Try again!");
    selection = scanner.nextInt();        
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is what @EtiennedeMartel describes in his answer; nextInt() does not remove the token from the scanner on failure and thus his program goes into a endless loop (as would yours). –  Brian Roach Nov 2 '11 at 16:38
    
This won't work. If nextInt() failed, then any call to nextInt() will fail again until the data is removed from the stream. –  Etienne de Martel Nov 2 '11 at 16:39
    
Yes, this doesn't work and just throws a subsequent Exception. –  slhck Nov 2 '11 at 16:48

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