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Although it is looking similar to my previous post but here purpose is different.

udit@udit-Dabba ~/ah $ cat decrypt.txt
60 00 00 00 00 17 3a 20  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02  *00 00 e0 f9 6a 61 61 6e
65 6b 61 68 61 6e 67 61  79 65 77 6f 64 69 6e* 00
00 00 03 29 

I want to extract last string of the file (here it is 29) in a shell varaible

I tried this ...

size=`wc -w encrypt.txt`

awk -v size=$size 'BEGIN {RS=" ";ORS=" ";}' {if (NR>size-1 &&
                                         NR < size+1)print $0}' decrypt.txt

Output : 29

But when I changed the file slightly ..

  udit@udit-Dabba ~/ah $ cat decrypt.txt
  60 00 00 00 00 17 3a 20  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 01  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02  *00 00 e0 f9 6a 61 61 6e
  65 6b 61 68 61 6e 67 61  79 65 77 6f 64 69 6e* 00
  65 6b 61 68 61 6e 67 61  00 00 03 29 

Output : 03

Why there is discrepency between the results ??

I am new to awk and shell features so I am not sure whether it is a right way to do so or not ???

I think there should be some variation of grep,sed,awk or any other linux command which may solve my problem but I am not aware of it.

Please guide me for this.

Thanx in advance.

Purpose :

Make two variables in a shell script which should store last and second last strings of an input file.

Limitation :

Every input file contains a blank line at the end of file.

(Like in above mentioned file , after the file contents there would be one more blank line just like hitting ENTER key and that can not be changed because it is being generated through a C program at run time.)

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to extract the entire last line or just the last two couple of hex ? – ziu Nov 2 '11 at 17:45
    
just the last one as here in this case it is 29 – Udit Gupta Nov 2 '11 at 18:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To get the last field:

awk '{ if (NF > 0) { last = $NF } } END { print last }' "$@"

The second last field is trickier for the case where there is just one field on the last line (so you need the last field from the line before).

awk '{ if (NF > 0)
       {
           if (NF == 1) { lastbut1 = last; last = $1; }
           else { lastbut1 = $(NF-1); last = $NF; }
       }
     }
     END { print lastbut1 " " last; }' "$@"

This produces a blank and the last value if the file contains but one value. It produces just a blank if there are no values at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't it make sense to tail the file to take some load off of poor awk? – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 2 '11 at 17:48
1  
It depends on the size of the files, and whether they are files or piped data, ... If the files are real files and are large (multi-megabyte or larger), then maybe tail can work its magic and produce the last lines without reading the whole file. However, I'd regard that as probably 'premature optimization' until it was shown that it was a bottleneck in the processing (which is unlikely, I think). – Jonathan Leffler Nov 2 '11 at 17:52
    
Agreed. (padding) – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 2 '11 at 18:01
FIRST="$(head -n 1 file)"
LAST="$(tail -n 1 file)"
LASTBUTONE="$(tail -n 2 file | head -n 1)"

naturally, you can cut off the last field in a variety of ways:

echo "$ONEOFTHOSE" | gawk '{print $(NF)}'
echo "$ONEOFTHOSE" | sed -e 's/^.*[[:space:]]//'
share|improve this answer

If you consider the record separator to be space or newline, then you just need to keep the last 2 records.

awk -v 'RS=[ \n]+' '{prev2 = prev1; prev1 = $0} END {print prev2, prev1}' filename
share|improve this answer
grep -v "^$" file | tr " " "\n" | tail -n 2

Maybe the grep-part isn't perfect and maybe should change.

Edit

tr -s " " "\n" < file | tail -n 2

is better solution - see Gordon Davisson's comment.

share|improve this answer
2  
Use tr -s " " "\n" <file -- the -s option "squeezes" together multiple newlines, thus handling blank lines, multiple spaces between words, etc. – Gordon Davisson Nov 2 '11 at 19:27
    
Great comment, updated! Thanks! – uzsolt Nov 3 '11 at 7:32

Here's a tr/sed solution:

answers=$(tr -d '\n' <input_file | sed -r 's/.*(\S\S)\s*(\S\S)\s*$/\1 \2/')
echo "Last = ${answers#???} Penultimate = ${answers%???}"

Sed only:

answers=$(sed -r '1{h;d};H;${x;y/\n/ /;s/.*(\S\S)\s*(\S\S)\s*$/\1 \2/p};d' input_file)
echo "Last = ${answers#???} Penultimate = ${answers%???}"
share|improve this answer

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