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I have the following sample commented GAS code

cmpb $45, (%ebx)  # 45 - ASCII '-'
jne r_filename
cmpb $118, 1(%ebx) # 118 - ASCII 'v'
jne r_filename
movl    $4,%eax        # write(
movl    $1,%ebx        #   STDOUT,
movl    $Leng, %edx     #   len *
movl    $Inform, %ecx #   *Buffer
int     $0x80          # );    

How to format comments like this using AWK:

cmpb $45, (%ebx)        # 45 - ASCII '-'
jne r_filename
cmpb $118, 1(%ebx)      # 118 - ASCII 'v'
jne r_filename
movl    $4,%eax         # write(
movl    $1,%ebx         #   STDOUT,
movl    $Leng, %edx     #   len *
movl    $Inform, %ecx   #   *Buffer
int     $0x80           # );  
share|improve this question
    
M-x align-regexp in Emacs will do this. indent-tabs-mode should probably be nil for the sake of sanity though. –  Jon Purdy Nov 2 '11 at 18:13
    
Don't overlook the little languages - like GNU sed for example sed -r '/#/!b;s/^([^#]*)(#.*)/printf "%- 40s %s" "\1" "\2"/e' does the job too! –  potong Nov 3 '11 at 15:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is an answer in Perl acceptable, too?

script.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

while(<>) {
        if(m/^(.+?)\s*(#.*)?$/) {
                my ($code, $comment) = ($1, $2);

                if($comment) {
                        printf "%- 40s %s\n", $code, $comment;
                }
                else {
                        print "$code\n";
                }
        }
        else {
                print;
        }
}

call it:

cat file.asm | perl script.pl
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, thanks. This is exactly what I need. –  bvk256 Nov 2 '11 at 18:05
    
or perl script.pl file.asm –  TLP Nov 2 '11 at 20:27
2  
That fails if there is a blank line. –  ikegami Nov 2 '11 at 21:39
    
@ikegami Define "That". –  TLP Nov 2 '11 at 22:13
    
@TLP, [The code posted by halo] fails if there is a blank line. –  ikegami Nov 2 '11 at 22:14

Auto-split perl one-liner. "If it's not broken up, don't fix it."

perl -F/(#)/ -ape 'if (@F > 1) { $F[0] = sprintf "%-40s",$F[0]; $_ = "@F" }' file
share|improve this answer
    
It's cleaner to split using a lookahead IMO. The 'i' flag would also be useful here. –  Zaid Nov 2 '11 at 19:27
    
@Zaid You could do in-place edit if you wished, however shell redirection would be safer for perl beginners. Why is it cleaner to split on a lookahead? This does the same thing. –  TLP Nov 2 '11 at 19:49
    
For this problem it doesn't matter, but split /(#)/ spits out three strings ( $code, '#', $comment ) while split /(?=#)/ returns the two ( $code, $comment ) –  Zaid Nov 3 '11 at 3:13
    
@Zaid I see your point. However, as you say, here it does not matter, as it is only the first string we are interested in manipulating. One might argue that it does add another space, though, when concatenating. –  TLP Nov 3 '11 at 3:41
perl -pe'
    $_ = sprintf("%-23s %s", $1, $2)
       if /^([^#]+)(#.*)/;
' file.in > file.out

I left comments in the first column in the first column. Use /^([^#]*)(#.*)/ to indent all comments.

You can also edit the file in place instead of creating a new file.

With backup:

perl -i~ -pe'...' file

Without backup:

perl -i -pe'...' file
share|improve this answer
    
+1 One thing that I am concerned about all our solutions is the possibility of hash signs inside quoted strings. But perhaps that does not apply to assembler code. –  TLP Nov 2 '11 at 22:38
    
@TLP, Yeah, I'm aware of that. It's probably just do a diff and adjust/remote any improper fixes afterwards. –  ikegami Nov 2 '11 at 23:26

C'mon guys, he specified Awk:

 awk -F# '{printf "%-30.30s #%s\n", $1, $2}' $oldFile > $newFile

The -F# uses the pound sign as a separator. The printf formats it. %30.30s says to print this field left justified 30 characters wide. The %s just says print the second field. The results are:

cmpb $45, (%ebx)               # 45 - ASCII '-'
jne r_filename                 #
cmpb $118, 1(%ebx)             # 118 - ASCII 'v'
jne r_filename                 #
movl    $4,%eax                # write(
movl    $1,%ebx                #   STDOUT,
movl    $Leng, %edx            #   len *
movl    $Inform, %ecx          #   *Buffer
int     $0x80                  # );    
share|improve this answer
    
That outputs # where there weren't any before. And it doesn't handle lines with multiple #. (@TLP, I preferred a working solution, which is why I used if /^([^#]+)(#.*)/ over "pretty" -F.) By the way, while the OP originally asked for an awk solution, he has since removed awk from the subject and added the Perl tag. –  ikegami Nov 2 '11 at 22:22
    
@ikegami Actually, I removed the awk from the title. Perhaps I shouldn't have. –  TLP Nov 2 '11 at 22:27
    
@ikegami - That outputs # where there weren't any before. Yeah, but it doesn't harm anything. I wanted to keep it as a simple one liner. I could test NR and use printf accordingly. When I pulled up the question, he still had the awk in there. He has since removed awk from the subject and added the Perl tag. I pulled it up a while ago, but didn't get around to answering it until just now. –  David W. Nov 2 '11 at 22:27
    
huh? How is inserting unwanted # not harmful? Sure, the assembler doesn't care, but code isn't just written for assemblers. –  ikegami Nov 2 '11 at 22:30
index($0, "#") {
    $0 = sprintf("%-24s%s",
                 substr($0, 1, index($0, "#") - 1),
                 substr($0, index($0, "#")));
}
1
share|improve this answer

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