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I got a problem with checking whether a member of a struct is null or not. For example:

typedef struct {
    int value;
} A;

int main() {
   A *foo = malloc(sizeof(A));
   foo->value++; // obviously, null pointer error
}

Then I attempted to check whether value is NULL or not by:

if (foo->value != NULL) {
    foo->value++;
}

But the error occured: comparison between pointer and integer.

What should I do? Note that set it to 0 is not an option in my circumstance.

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3  
NULL in C does not mean "has no value" or "not initialized". An uninitialized int still has a value, you just can't be sure what the value is. NULL is just a value you can give to a pointer as a sort of flag to show the pointer isn't being used. –  Dmitri Nov 2 '11 at 19:41
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6 Answers

You probably meant

if (foo)
    foo->value++;

Also your comment "obviously null pointer error" is not so obvious to me.

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foo->value++; // obviously, null pointer error

Not so obvious to me why this is an error. value is an int, not an int *, so how can it ever be a NULL pointer?

I think you meant to perform the following check

A *foo = malloc(sizeof(A));
if( foo != NULL ) {
  foo->value++; // increment value
} else {
  // allocation failed, do something about it
}

When you malloc a structure enough memory is allocated to contain all members of that structure; you do not have allocate memory for every single member.

Note that the contents of the structure itself are uninitialized after the malloc call. To set the members to a deterministic state you can do any one of the following:

  • foo->value = 0; Similarly initialize all other members
  • memset( foo, 0, sizeof(*foo) ); This sets all bits within the structure to zeros
  • A *foo = calloc( 1, sizeof(A) ); calloc automatically zero initializes the allocated memory
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It is uninitialized though, maybe OP is mixing that up. –  delnan Nov 2 '11 at 18:27
    
@delnan That's true, I'll add that, thanks –  Praetorian Nov 2 '11 at 18:28
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An int isn't a pointer. It can't be NULL (or at least that value is indistinguishable from zero).

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That's an int, not a pointer, so it doesn't make much sense to compare it to NULL. If you want to be able to do that, then you need to declare it in the struct as an int*. Otherwise just make sure you initialize it to 0 when you create the struct.

To expand on the above, it's important to be aware that when you malloc() that struct, the space for that int is ALREADY IN the space provided by the malloc(). The struct literally contains the int, not just a pointer to it.

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The int type is not a pointer so it can not be a NULL pointer. When you create a struct enough room is allocated for your values but you still need to initialize its contents, otherwise they will be set to what was previously in the allocated space, and sometimes this best done using another function.

A *createA()
{
    A *a = malloc(sizeof(A));
    //TODO: make sure a is no null
    a->value = 0;
    return a;
}

Calling createA will now always return a struct with the int value set to 0.

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As others have pointed out, int is not a pointer type and cannot be NULL. However, I believe what you were trying to get at by the 'obviously, null pointer error' remark was that memory obtained from malloc is not initialized, so foo->value++ won't necessarily leave you with 1. To fix this you can either use calloc or memset:

calloc:

int main() {
   A *foo = calloc(1, sizeof(A)); // returns 0'd memory
   foo->value++;
}

memset:

int main() {
   A *foo = malloc(sizeof(A));
   memset(foo, 0, sizeof(*foo)); // sets the contents of the struct to 0
   foo->value++;
}

You can also manually 0 the fields, which works fine, but you leave yourself open to forgetting to zero new fields you add to the struct later.

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