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I want to find a table cell that contains the link (\d{0,3} )?pieces.

How would I need to write this xpath?

Can I simply insert the xpath directly into the Capybara search? Or do I need to do something special to indicate it is a regex? Or can I not do it at all?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Xpath 1.0

XPath 1.0 does not include regular expression support. You should be able to achieve the desired match with the following expression:

//td/a['pieces'=substring(@href, string-length(@href) - 
                                 string-length('pieces') + 1) and 
       'pieces'=translate(@href, '0123456789', '') and 
        string-length(@href) > 5 and 
        string-length(@href) < 10]

The first test in the predicate checks that the string ends with pieces. The second test ensures that the entire string equals pieces when all of the digits are removed (i.e. there are no other characters). The final two tests ensure that the entire length of the string is between 6 and 9, which is the length of pieces plus zero to three digits.

Test it on the following document:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td><a href="444pieces">test0</a></td>
        <td>no match</td>
        <td>no match</td>
        <td><a href="123pieces">test1</a></td>
        <td><a href="12pieces">test2</a></td>
        <td><a href="1232pieces">no match</a></td>
        <td><a href="pieces">test3</a></td>
    </tr>
</table>

It should match only the test0, test1, test2, and test3 links.

(Note: The expression may be further complicated by the possibility of other characters preceding the portion you're attempting to match.)

XPath 2.0

Achieving this in XPath 2.0 is trivial with the matches function.

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From what I understand, Capybara uses Xpath 2.0 - Would this change things to make them any easier? –  GlyphGryph Nov 2 '11 at 19:52
    
@GlyphGryph - Much easier. XPath 2.0 has a matches function: w3.org/TR/xpath-functions/#func-matches –  lwburk Nov 2 '11 at 19:55

//td/a[ substring-after(concat(@href ,'x') ,'pieces')='x' and 111>=concat(0 ,translate( substring-before(@href ,'pieces') ,'0123456789 -.' ,'1111111111xxx')) ]

This is another solution, not necessarily better, but, perhaps, interesting.

The first conjunct is true just when @href contains exactly one occurrence of 'pieces', and it is at the end. The second conjunct is true just when the part of @href before 'pieces' is empty or is a numeral made entirely of digits (no .,-, or white-space), with at most 3 digits. The number of 1's in the '111>=' is the maximum number of digits that will match.

Reference: http://www.w3.org/TR/xpath

  • The substring-after function returns the substring of the first argument string that follows the first occurrence of the second argument string in the first argument string, or the empty string if the first argument string does not contain the second argument string.

  • The substring-before function returns the substring of the first argument string that precedes the first occurrence of the second argument string in the first argument string, or the empty string if the first argument string does not contain the second argument string.

  • ... a string that consists of optional whitespace followed by an optional minus sign followed by a Number followed by whitespace is converted to the IEEE 754 number ... any other string is converted to NaN

  • Number ::= Digits ('.' Digits?)? | '.' Digits

  • An attribute node has a string-value. The string-value is the normalized value as specified by the XML Recommendation [XML]

  • The normalize-space function returns the argument string with whitespace normalized by stripping leading and trailing whitespace and replacing sequences of whitespace characters by a single space.

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