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I got this question in an interview the other day and would like to know some best possible answers(I did not answer very well haha):

Scenario: There is a webpage that is monitoring the bytes sent over a some network. Every time a byte is sent the recordByte() function is called passing that byte, this could happen hundred of thousands of times per day. There is a button on this page that when pressed displays the last 100 bytes passed to recordByte() on screen (it does this by calling the print method below).

The following code is what I was given and asked to fill out:

public class networkTraffic {
    public void recordByte(Byte b){
    }
    public String print() {
    }
}

What is the best way to store the 100 bytes? A list? Curious how best to do this.

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70  
Circular buffer using an array is one way. Initialize it with 0's, then just keep track of head and length. You can then use head and length to loop around the buffer to print it. Efficient use of memory and CPU, plus suits historical needs. –  Tim Lloyd Nov 2 '11 at 19:28
1  
You could also use a ByteBuffer: download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/nio/ByteBuffer.html –  Stephan Nov 2 '11 at 19:31
2  
is it necessary to keep all bytes or only the last 100? –  jpredham Nov 2 '11 at 19:31
2  
I would use a Stack, Just push the bytes that get sent in and then pop the last 100 results. –  Alvin Baena Nov 2 '11 at 19:32
5  
@alvinbaena what happens when days or weeks of recordByte() pass without anyone calling print()? –  Russell Borogove Nov 2 '11 at 22:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 146 down vote accepted

Something like this (circular buffer) :

Byte buffer[100];
int index;
public void recordByte(Byte b) {
   index = (index + 1) % 100;
   buffer[index] = b; 
}

public void print() {
   for(int i = index; i < index + 100; i++) {
       System.out.print(buffer[i % 100]);
   }
}

The benefits of using a circular buffer:

  1. You can reserve the space statically. In a real-time network application (VoIP, streaming,..)this is often done because you don't need to store all data of a transmission, but only a window containing the new bytes to be processed.
  2. It's fast: can be implemented with an array with read and write cost of O(1).
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6  
You'll run into unexpected behavior when you reach the max value of int, but otherwise it seems about right. –  drwelden Nov 2 '11 at 19:38
2  
close but subject to errors when index grows too big. Instead use this in recordByte: index = (index + 1) % 100; array[index] = b; –  DwB Nov 2 '11 at 19:41
3  
Better to use a condition at the end to wrap around instead of a modulo, it's probably both a bit clearer and a bit faster (and if you are doing this for every byte sent, performance will matter). –  jmoreno Nov 3 '11 at 2:51
4  
I think you need to track the length otherwise if print is called before 100 bytes are recorded then you print out 100 bytes anyway, some of which are unitialised array values (zeros) –  Mike Q Nov 3 '11 at 11:02
3  
You could use 128 instead of 100 bytes. That will waste 28 bytes but the modulo operation will be faster. For such a short function the speed improvement will be significant. –  Mackie Messer Nov 11 '11 at 21:53

I don't know java, but there must be a queue concept whereby you would enqueue bytes until the number of items in the queue reached 100, at which point you would dequeue one byte and then enqueue another.

public void recordByte(Byte b)
{ 
  if (queue.ItemCount >= 100)
  {
    queue.dequeue();    
  }
  queue.enqueue(b);
}

You could print by peeking at the items:

public String print() 
{ 
  foreach (Byte b in queue)
  {
    print("X", b);  // some hexadecimal print function
  }
}  
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for a Queue. LinkedList implements the Queue interface and should allow the add() (enqueue) and remove() (dequeue) operations to run in O(1) time. –  sceaj Nov 2 '11 at 19:39
    
Stack was my first thought but the question doesn't say how it wants the data presented (in order of appearance vs latest byte first). .. after all the last 100 bytes of anything is not exactly going to useful other than for metrics/reporting. –  Feisty Mango Nov 2 '11 at 19:57
    
@MatthewCox Yeah I mean as an interview question it wasn't really useful except as a test of problem solving, but I was curious as how best to actually do it. –  Yottagray Nov 2 '11 at 20:00
    
@MatthewCox Technically a stack doesn't allow access to the oldest data (the first entries), just THE latest entry, hence the queue. –  sceaj Nov 2 '11 at 20:30
    
@sceaj I would argue that point. You still have iterators ... you aren't limited to only the first item of the stack. With your point, the same applies in the inverse way. You would only have access to the oldest bytes and not the newest since a queue only removes from the front. –  Feisty Mango Nov 2 '11 at 20:35

Circular Buffer using array:

  1. Array of 100 bytes
  2. Keep track of where the head index is i
  3. For recordByte() put the current byte in A[i] and i = i+1 % 100;
  4. For print(), return subarray(i+1, 100) concatenate with subarray(0, i)

Queue using linked list (or the java Queue):

  1. For recordByte() add new byte to the end
  2. If the new length to be more than 100, remove the first element
  3. For print() simply print the list
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Here is my code. It might look a bit obscure, but I am pretty sure this is the fastest way to do it (at least it would be in C++, not so sure about Java):

public class networkTraffic {
    public networkTraffic() {
      _ary = new byte[100];
      _idx = _ary.length;
    }

    public void recordByte(Byte b){
      _ary[--_idx] = b;
      if (_idx == 0) {
        _idx = _ary.length;
      }   
    }

    private int _idx;
    private byte[] _ary;
}

Some points to note:

  • No data is allocated/deallocated when calling recordByte().
  • I did not use %, because it is slower than a direct comparison and using the if (branch prediction might help here too)
  • --_idx is faster than _idx-- because no temporary variable is involved.
  • I count backwards to 0, because then I do not have to get _ary.length each time in the call, but only every 100 times when the first entry is reached. Maybe this is not necessary, the compiler could take care of it.
  • if there were less than 100 calls to recordByte(), the rest is zeroes.
share|improve this answer
1  
Upvoted because you're right, but in Java I'd be less worried about the temporary variable and the avoiding checking the length. Both of those are things that I would expect any decent JIT would optimize away. –  Daniel Pryden Nov 3 '11 at 1:49
    
I would upvote if you would add the required print() method too. –  icza Aug 18 at 12:55

Easiest thing is to shove it in an array. The max size that the array can accommodate is 100 bytes. Keep adding bytes as they are streaming off the web. After the first 100 bytes are in the array, when the 101st byte comes, remove the byte at the head (i.e. 0th). Keep doing this. This is basically a queue. FIFO concept. Ater the download is done, you are left with the last 100 bytes.

Not just after the download but at any given point in time, this array will have the last 100 bytes.

@Yottagray Not getting where the problem is? There seems to be a number of generic approaches (array, circular array etc) & a number of language specific approaches (byteArray etc). Am I missing something?

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what happens if print() is called after over 100 bytes have been recorded? –  jpredham Nov 2 '11 at 19:33
    
you dont record over 100 bytes. stop when <= 100. –  Srikar Appal Nov 2 '11 at 19:36
1  
That would get the first 100 bytes, not the last 100. –  interjay Nov 2 '11 at 19:37
    
I guess I don't really understand how to handle keeping only the last 100 bytes, and do it in a really efficient manner. Your answer doesn't make any sense, what if your array reaches 100 and recordByte() is called again? Your solution is only holding the 1st 100 bytes –  Yottagray Nov 2 '11 at 19:38

Multithreaded solution with non-blocking I/O:

private static final int N = 100;
private volatile byte[] buffer1 = new byte[N];
private volatile byte[] buffer2 = new byte[N];
private volatile int index = -1;
private volatile int tag;

synchronized public void recordByte(byte b) {
  index++;
  if (index == N * 2) {
    //both buffers are full
    buffer1 = buffer2;
    buffer2 = new byte[N];
    index = N;
  }
  if (index < N) {
    buffer1[index] = b;
  } else { 
    buffer2[index - N] = b;
  }
}

public void print() {
  byte[] localBuffer1, localBuffer2;
  int localIndex, localTag;
  synchronized (this) {
   localBuffer1 = buffer1;
   localBuffer2 = buffer2;
   localIndex = index;
   localTag = tag++;
  }
  int buffer1Start = localIndex - N >= 0 ? localIndex - N + 1 : 0;
  int buffer1End = localIndex < N ? localIndex : N - 1;      
  printSlice(localBuffer1, buffer1Start, buffer1End, localTag);
  if (localIndex >= N) {
    printSlice(localBuffer2, 0, localIndex - N, localTag);
  }
}

private void printSlice(byte[] buffer, int start, int end, int tag) {
  for(int i = start; i <= end; i++) {
    System.out.println(tag + ": "+ buffer[i]);
  }
}
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Just for the heck of it. How about using an ArrayList<Byte>? Say why not?

public class networkTraffic {
    static ArrayList<Byte> networkMonitor;          // ArrayList<Byte> reference
    static { networkMonitor = new ArrayList<Byte>(100); }   // Static Initialization Block
    public void recordByte(Byte b){
        networkMonitor.add(b);
        while(networkMonitor.size() > 100){
            networkMonitor.remove(0);
        }
    }
    public void print() {
        for (int i = 0; i < networkMonitor.size(); i++) {
            System.out.println(networkMonitor.get(i));
        }
        // if(networkMonitor.size() < 100){
        //  for(int i = networkMonitor.size(); i < 100; i++){
        //      System.out.println("Emtpy byte");
        //  }
        // }
    }
}
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