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What is the difference between the following coding ways:

if (String::IsNullOrEmpty(TextBox1->Text)) 

and

if (TextBox1->Text == "") 

?

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1  
BTW, why question marked by the c# tag? –  sll Nov 2 '11 at 20:14
    
The edit totally changed your question. It would be only fair then to make this clear. –  Thomas Weller Nov 2 '11 at 20:15
    
this is C++-CLI question.. not C# –  Nayan Nov 2 '11 at 20:16
1  
It is applicable to C# as I guess! –  Ahmed AlGhafri Nov 3 '11 at 8:16

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The first one checks for null as well.

A TextBox->Text property will never be null but consider (C#):

string s1 = null;
string s2 = "";

string.IsNullOrEmpty(s1)    // true
string.IsNullOrEmpty(s2)    // true

s1 == ""    // false
s2 == ""    // true

The IsNullOrEmpty() function is just a handy helper to check 2 (error) conditions at once.

So your title is slightly off, this is about empty and null. Because:

string.Empty == ""     // true

A string is an object. s1 and s2 are not strings but references (pointers) to strings. null is a special reference value meaning 'not pointing to an object'. An empty string is a valid string object with length=0

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NULL doesn't mean empty? What is the difference between NULL and empty exactly? –  Ahmed AlGhafri Nov 3 '11 at 8:15
3  
Adban, a string is an object. s1 and s2 are not strings but references (pointers) to strings. null is a special reference value meaning 'not pointing to an object'. An empty string is a valid string object with length=0 –  Henk Holterman Nov 3 '11 at 8:35

The major difference is that String::IsNullOrEmpty() also tests a string variable for null. for example, both of these methods would return true:

public bool TestString(string theString){
  return String::IsNullOrEmpty(theString);
}

string emptyString; //currently a null object
TestString(emptyString); //returns true
emptyString = "";
TestString(emptyString); //also returns true
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TextBox1->Text="" is assignment. You meant to write TextBox1->Text=="".

String::IsNullOrEmpty() tests true for null or the empty string, as its name indicates. As it happens, for your example, TextBox1->Text will never evaluate to null.

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Downvote presumably because of the comment about = vs ==? Question was edited! –  David Heffernan Nov 2 '11 at 20:22
    
Question edit seems to have been by a third-party as well :( –  Ben Voigt Nov 3 '11 at 14:25

IsNullorEmpty will return true if the string is null. Other than that they are exactly the same.

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The second statement is an assignment, not an equality operator.

Looks like you confused = and == (btw. the single most prominent error source in C++).

Thomas

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The first one checks for either of these:

string x = null //x is null, unassigned
string x = "" //x is a string, but with nothing in it.

The second only checks if

x == ""
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The first statement return true if the string is null or empty the second only if the string is empty so, the first statement can be translated in :

if(TextBox1->Text == null ) || TextBox1->Text == "") 
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Don't change the meaning of the question when you edit! –  Ben Voigt Nov 3 '11 at 14:25

The first line "if(IsNullOrEmpty(TextBox1->Text))" can be written like this:

if (TextBox1->Text== null || TextBox1->Text == "")

The second statement is an assignment (And not a comparison) You're doing "x = value"; But if you made a typo, it means that you're not testing for null (compared to the first statement.

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