Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

That is pretty easy with a plain hash like

{:a => "a", :b => "b"}

which would translate into

"a=a&b=b"

but what do you do with something more complex like

{:a => "a", :b => ["c", "d", "e"]}

which should translate in

"a=a&b[0]=c&b[1]=d&b[2]=e"

or even worse, with something like:

{:a => "a", :b => [{:c => "c", :d => "d"}, {:e => "e", :f => "f"}]

Thanks for the much appreciated help with that!

share|improve this question
    
The edit does not probably follow grammar to the tee, but I am hoping that it makes the post more readable. If not, feel free to rollback. –  dirkgently Apr 28 '09 at 16:11
    
Thx, you're right, it is better like this! ;) –  Julien Genestoux Apr 28 '09 at 16:13
    
It sounds like you want to convert JSON into HTTP params... perhaps you need a different encoding? –  CookieOfFortune Apr 28 '09 at 16:21
    
Hum, this is actually not Json, but a Ruby Hash... not sure I understand why encoding matters here. –  Julien Genestoux Apr 28 '09 at 16:51
    
The answer by lmanners ought to be promoted. There are a lot of great roll-your-own answers here (many with high scores) but ActiveSupport has since added standardized support for this, rendering the conversation moot. Unfortunately, lmanner's answer is still buried down the list. –  Noach Magedman May 16 '13 at 9:49

10 Answers 10

up vote 62 down vote accepted

Julien, your self-answer is a good one, and I've shameless borrowed from it, but it doesn't properly escape reserved characters, and there are a few other edge cases where it breaks down.

require "addressable/uri"
uri = Addressable::URI.new
uri.query_values = {:a => "a", :b => ["c", "d", "e"]}
uri.query
# => "a=a&b[0]=c&b[1]=d&b[2]=e"
uri.query_values = {:a => "a", :b => [{:c => "c", :d => "d"}, {:e => "e", :f => "f"}]}
uri.query
# => "a=a&b[0][c]=c&b[0][d]=d&b[1][e]=e&b[1][f]=f"
uri.query_values = {:a => "a", :b => {:c => "c", :d => "d"}}
uri.query
# => "a=a&b[c]=c&b[d]=d"
uri.query_values = {:a => "a", :b => {:c => "c", :d => true}}
uri.query
# => "a=a&b[c]=c&b[d]"
uri.query_values = {:a => "a", :b => {:c => "c", :d => true}, :e => []}
uri.query
# => "a=a&b[c]=c&b[d]"

The gem is 'addressable'

gem install addressable
share|improve this answer
1  
Thx! What are the edge cases where my solution breaks? so I can do add it to the specs? –  Julien Genestoux May 5 '09 at 18:09
2  
It doesn't handle booleans, and this is clearly undesirable: {"a" => "a&b=b"}.to_params –  Bob Aman May 6 '09 at 17:29
1  
Nice gem and does it right. –  Ernest May 9 '12 at 13:25
3  
FYI, unfortunately this behavior has been removed from Addressable as of 2.3 (github.com/sporkmonger/addressable/commit/…) –  oif_vet Sep 13 '12 at 23:03
2  
@oif_vet Could you say what behaviour has been removed? Bob's suggested appraoch of using the addressable gem to solve the original poster's problem works for me as of addressable-2.3.2. –  sheldonh Jan 16 '13 at 12:26

For basic, non-nested hashes, Rails/ActiveSupport has Object#to_query.

>> {:a => "a", :b => ["c", "d", "e"]}.to_query
=> "a=a&b%5B%5D=c&b%5B%5D=d&b%5B%5D=e"
>> CGI.unescape({:a => "a", :b => ["c", "d", "e"]}.to_query)
=> "a=a&b[]=c&b[]=d&b[]=e"

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/Object.html#method-i-to_query

share|improve this answer
1  
Why do you say it's broken? the output you showed is ok, isn't? –  tokland Mar 10 '11 at 13:14
    
I just tried it and you seem to be right. Maybe my statement was originally due to the way an earlier version of rails parsed the query string (I seemed to recall it overwriting the previous 'b' values). Started GET "/?a=a&b%5B%5D=c&b%5B%5D=d&b%5B%5D=e" for 127.0.0.1 at 2011-03-10 11:19:40 -0600 Processing by SitesController#index as HTML Parameters: {"a"=>"a", "b"=>["c", "d", "e"]} –  Gabe Martin-Dempesy Mar 10 '11 at 17:21
    
So useful! Thanks for this! –  stuartc Nov 13 '13 at 8:02
    
Thank you, saved my day from lot of ugly coding –  bragboy Feb 21 at 18:53

There's a much easier way to do this if you're using Rails: http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveSupport/CoreExtensions/Hash/to_query

So you could do:

{:a => "a", :b => "b"}.to_query
share|improve this answer
    
This is clearly the best solution if you are using Rails - if not, you could use the active_support gem in your project (and just require this one extension, not the whole gem to save on load times/memory). –  Asfand Yar Qazi Jun 19 '13 at 12:22
    
works with a nested params hash as well params.to_query –  andrewcockerham Sep 22 at 12:42

If you are using Ruby 1.9.2 or later, you can use URI.encode_www_form if you don't need arrays.

E.g. (from the Ruby docs in 1.9.3):

URI.encode_www_form([["q", "ruby"], ["lang", "en"]])
#=> "q=ruby&lang=en"
URI.encode_www_form("q" => "ruby", "lang" => "en")
#=> "q=ruby&lang=en"
URI.encode_www_form("q" => ["ruby", "perl"], "lang" => "en")
#=> "q=ruby&q=perl&lang=en"
URI.encode_www_form([["q", "ruby"], ["q", "perl"], ["lang", "en"]])
#=> "q=ruby&q=perl&lang=en"

You'll notice that array values are not set with key names containing [] like we've all become used to in query strings. The spec that encode_www_form uses is in accordance with the HTML5 definition of application/x-www-form-urlencoded data.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1, this is by far the best. It doesn't depend on any sources outside of Ruby itself. –  Danyel Aug 21 '13 at 22:44
    
+1 works fine with '{:a => "a", :b => {:c => "c", :d => true}, :e => []}' example –  Duke Sep 19 '13 at 5:57
1  
Does not seem to work with ruby 2.0 - the hash {:c => "c", :d => true} appears to be inspected, so sent through as a string. –  user208769 Dec 13 '13 at 23:29
1  
It was a section of the larger snippet above - ruby -ruri -e 'puts RUBY_VERSION; puts URI.encode_www_form({:a => "a", :b => {:c => "c", :d => true}, :e => []})' # outputs 2.0.0 a=a&b=%7B%3Ac%3D%3E%22c%22%2C+%3Ad%3D%3Etrue%7D& –  user208769 Dec 16 '13 at 19:40
1  
This should be the answer. –  yangtheman Mar 27 at 22:41

No need to load up the bloated ActiveSupport or roll your own, you can use Rack::Utils.build_query and Rack::Utils.build_nested_query. Here's a blog post that gives a good example:

require 'rack'

Rack::Utils.build_query(
  authorization_token: "foo",
  access_level: "moderator",
  previous: "index"
)

# => "authorization_token=foo&access_level=moderator&previous=index"

It even handles arrays:

Rack::Utils.build_query( {:a => "a", :b => ["c", "d", "e"]} )
# => "a=a&b=c&b=d&b=e"
Rack::Utils.parse_query _
# => {"a"=>"a", "b"=>["c", "d", "e"]}

Or the more difficult nested stuff:

Rack::Utils.build_nested_query( {:a => "a", :b => [{:c => "c", :d => "d"}, {:e => "e", :f => "f"}] } )
# => "a=a&b[][c]=c&b[][d]=d&b[][e]=e&b[][f]=f"
Rack::Utils.parse_nested_query _
# => {"a"=>"a", "b"=>[{"c"=>"c", "d"=>"d", "e"=>"e", "f"=>"f"}]}
share|improve this answer
    
Your nested example demonstrates that it doesn't work properly--when you start, :b is an array of two hashes. You end up with :b being an array of one bigger hash. –  Ed Ruder Feb 5 '13 at 23:13
    
@EdRuder there's no properly because there's no accepted standard. What it does show is that it's a lot closer than anyone else's attempt, judging by the other answers. –  iain Feb 6 '13 at 0:35
    
This method is deprecated since Rails 2.3.8: apidock.com/rails/Rack/Utils/build_query –  davidgoli May 6 '13 at 22:09
2  
@davidgoli Erm, not in Rack it's not github.com/rack/rack/blob/1.5.2/lib/rack/utils.rb#L140. If you want to use it in Rails, surely it's as simple as require 'rack'? It must be there, considering all the major Ruby web frameworks are built on top of Rack now. –  iain May 16 '13 at 13:10

Steal from Merb:

# File merb/core_ext/hash.rb, line 87
def to_params
  params = ''
  stack = []

  each do |k, v|
    if v.is_a?(Hash)
      stack << [k,v]
    else
      params << "#{k}=#{v}&"
    end
  end

  stack.each do |parent, hash|
    hash.each do |k, v|
      if v.is_a?(Hash)
        stack << ["#{parent}[#{k}]", v]
      else
        params << "#{parent}[#{k}]=#{v}&"
      end
    end
  end

  params.chop! # trailing &
  params
end

See http://noobkit.com/show/ruby/gems/development/merb/hash/to_params.html

share|improve this answer
1  
Unfortunately, this deosn't work when we have a nested Array inside the params (see example #2)... :( –  Julien Genestoux Apr 28 '09 at 16:50
1  
And does not do any king of escaping. –  Ernest May 9 '12 at 13:17

Here's a short and sweet one liner if you only need to support simple ASCII key/value query strings:

hash = {"foo" => "bar", "fooz" => 123}
# => {"foo"=>"bar", "fooz"=>123}
query_string = hash.to_a.map { |x| "#{x[0]}=#{x[1]}" }.join("&")
# => "foo=bar&fooz=123"
share|improve this answer
class Hash
  def to_params
    params = ''
    stack = []

    each do |k, v|
      if v.is_a?(Hash)
        stack << [k,v]
      elsif v.is_a?(Array)
        stack << [k,Hash.from_array(v)]
      else
        params << "#{k}=#{v}&"
      end
    end

    stack.each do |parent, hash|
      hash.each do |k, v|
        if v.is_a?(Hash)
          stack << ["#{parent}[#{k}]", v]
        else
          params << "#{parent}[#{k}]=#{v}&"
        end
      end
    end

    params.chop! 
    params
  end

  def self.from_array(array = [])
    h = Hash.new
    array.size.times do |t|
      h[t] = array[t]
    end
    h
  end

end
share|improve this answer

I know this is an old question, but I just wanted to post this bit of code as I could not find a simple gem to do just this task for me.

module QueryParams

  def self.encode(value, key = nil)
    case value
    when Hash  then value.map { |k,v| encode(v, append_key(key,k)) }.join('&')
    when Array then value.map { |v| encode(v, "#{key}[]") }.join('&')
    when nil   then ''
    else            
      "#{key}=#{CGI.escape(value.to_s)}" 
    end
  end

  private

  def self.append_key(root_key, key)
    root_key.nil? ? key : "#{root_key}[#{key.to_s}]"
  end
end

Rolled up as gem here: https://github.com/simen/queryparams

share|improve this answer
1  
URI.escape != CGI.escape and for URL you want the first one. –  Ernest May 9 '12 at 13:16
    
Actually not, @Ernest. When e.g. embedding another url as a parameter to your url (lets say this is the return url to be redirected to after login) URI.escape will keep the '?' and '&' of the embedded url in place breaking the surrounding url, while CGI.escape will correctly tuck them away for later as %3F and %26. CGI.escape("http://localhost/search?q=banana&limit=7") => "http%3A%2F%2Flocalhost%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dbanana%26limit%3D7" URI.escape("http://localhost/search?q=banana&limit=7") => "http://localhost/search?q=banana&limit=7" –  svale May 23 '12 at 19:08
{:a=>"a", :b=>"b", :c=>"c"}.map{ |x,v| "#{x}=#{v}" }.reduce{|x,v| "#{x}&#{v}" }

"a=a&b=b&c=c"

Here's another way. For simple queries.

share|improve this answer
1  
you really ought to make sure you are properly URI-escaping your keys and values though. Even for simple cases. It'll bite you. –  jrochkind May 5 at 20:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.