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So, I was wondering how to compile C#. I have Windows 7 Enterprise. Is there a built-in or do I have do download one?

If I have to download one, what do you recommend?

I have gooled this, and it told me about "csc.exe" but I can't find this.

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I'd recommend VisualStudio 2010, I'm assuming this is a work PC since you have W7 Enterprise, so I'd see if your workplace has a VS2010 license too. You can use command line tools, of course, but the VS2010 suite is a great productivity booster. –  James Michael Hare Nov 2 '11 at 21:03
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Start by installing Visual Studio Express edition 2010 –  sll Nov 2 '11 at 21:04
    
try it >where csc at command prompt –  BLUEPIXY Nov 2 '11 at 21:55
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13 Answers

For any real development, an IDE is preferable. Microsoft offers the Visual Studio Express edition for free, which has everything you need to get started with C#.

However, you can compile using just the command line compiler (csc.exe), which is included with the framework.

It should be located in the .NET installation dir; for instance on my machine for .NET 4, 64 bit version, I have a csc.exe in:

C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319
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Since you're starting fresh, why not use an IDE that does it for you?

http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/visual-csharp-express

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You can use Visual Studio Express edition which is a full featured free IDE from Microsoft that will compile C#.

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For literally compiling C#: Native Image Generator

Otherwise get Visual Studio.

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Best bet is to download visual studio, I think there is a free cut down version on the MS website somewhere.

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Using Visual Studio will be the easiest way. There are free editions available - see http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/express for details.

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You need Visual Studio to compile it once you have it installed. Once you have it installed you can go to Visual Studio Command Prompt and Use C# compiler csc.exe to compile it.

Look here for more information Command-Line Building

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You need to have the framework installed (2.0, minimum). Then follow this old article for a simple how-to:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms379563(v=vs.80).aspx

NOTE: Microsoft IDEs like VS can do this for you also.

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Windows 7 comes with all versions of the .NET Framework up to 3.5 –  Neil Nov 2 '11 at 21:34
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Not sure if you can do this by default with Windows 7 Enterprise. At very least you are likely going need visual studio.

You can get Visual C# here for free: http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/visual-csharp-express

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I would advice Visual Studio, the express edition is for free, you can find more information on the microsoft site over here.

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You can find the command-line compiler, csc.exe, in \Windows\Microsoft.Net\Framework\vX.Y.

However, you will probably want to use Visual Studio, Microsoft's world-class IDE.
You can download the free version.

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Use the command line compiler csc

C:\>csc file.cs
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Your choices are:

  1. csc.exe (the command line compiler), which is in c:\Windows\Microsoft.Net\Framework\v4.0.30319\
  2. Install Visual Studio Express, the free edition of VS, for Windows/Console Applications, Web Applications, or Windows Phone Applications
  3. Purchase a license for Visual Studio 2010 or get an MSDN subscription
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