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I'm trying to subclass a class that uses singleton pattern and populate the instance with the subclass.

I seem to be having a little trouble.

class Singleton {

    static private $instance;

    static public function instance(){
        if(is_null(self::$instance)){
            self::$instance = new self();
        }
        return self::$instance;
    }

    private function __construct(){}

}

class MySingleton extends Singleton {

}

echo get_class(MySingleton::instance()); //=> Singleton

//=> I'm hoping to see MySingleton
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What is the trouble, what doesn't work? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 2 '11 at 21:07
    
@Pekka, I want the class to be MySingleton (as noted in the comment), not Singleton; –  maček Nov 2 '11 at 21:09
    
@Pekka his question is hiding as comments at the bottom :p –  Mike B Nov 2 '11 at 21:13
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What you're looking for is late static binding which is a new feature of PHP 5.3. Try replacing new self() with new static() and this should work for you.

self always references the containing class, whereas static references the "called" class.

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Perfect! Thanks, Michael :) –  maček Nov 2 '11 at 21:13
    
that won't work if he also wants to keep the ability to use Singleton on its own. –  Kris Nov 2 '11 at 21:14
    
Whoa I consider myself a PHP enthusiast and I was unaware of this..Then again I'm still using 5.2.x haha This is fantastic!! –  mmmshuddup Nov 2 '11 at 21:14
    
Never consider yourself expert in programming ;) –  dynamic Nov 2 '11 at 21:16
    
Hehe touche, my friend! –  mmmshuddup Nov 2 '11 at 21:17
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Your singleton base class prevents that as is. if you change the code to this though, it will work.

<?php


class Singleton {

    static private $instances = array();

    static public function instance(){
        $class = get_called_class();
        if(!isset(self::$instances[$class])){
            self::$instances[$class] = new $class();
        }
        return self::$instances[$class];
    }

    private function __construct(){}

}

class MySingleton extends Singleton {

}

echo get_class(MySingleton::instance()); //=> MySingleton

Now it works because Singleton allows for one instance per child class.

share|improve this answer
    
I just want to prevent people from modifying the parent class. The app will still access the singleton using the parent class, but i want developers to be able to overwrite any functionality in the subclass. Can you think of any reason I'd need to maintain a separate instance of the parent class? –  maček Nov 2 '11 at 21:17
    
That depends wholly on what you are using it for. but the other solution will blow up if somewhere in your code there is Singleton::instance() before MySingleton::instance() because it will always only have an instance of whichever got called first. –  Kris Nov 2 '11 at 21:20
    
Kris, thanks for the heads-up. I am aware that MySingleton::instance() needs to be called first. Thanks :) –  maček Nov 2 '11 at 21:21
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this works

<?php

class Singleton {

    static private $instance;
    static public function instance(){
        static $instance = null;  
        return $instance ?: $instance = new static;
    }

    public function __construct(){}

}

class MySingleton extends Singleton {
}

But i recommend the following one:

<?php
class Singleton {

    static protected $instance;              //should not be private

    static public function instance(){
        if(is_null(static::$instance)){         
            static::$instance = new static();
        }
        return static::$instance;

    }

    public function __construct(){}

}

class MySingleton extends Singleton {
    static protected $instance;    //must explicitly declared
}
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