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I am trying to compare performance between raw pointers, boost shared_ptr and boost weak_ptr. On the dereferencing part, I expected shared_ptr and raw_ptr to be equal, but results show that shared_ptr is about twice as slow. For the test, I am creating an array with either pointers or shared pointers to ints, and then dereferencing in a loop like this:

int result;
for(int i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
{
  for(int i = 0; i != SIZE; ++i)
    result += *array[i];
}

The full code for the test can be found here: https://github.com/coolfluid/coolfluid3/blob/master/test/common/utest-ptr-benchmark.cpp

Test timings for an optimized build without assertions can be found here: http://coolfluidsrv.vki.ac.be/cdash/testDetails.php?test=145592&build=7777

The values of interest are "DerefShared time" and "DerefRaw time"

I guess the test may be flawed somehow, but I failed to figure out where the difference comes from. Profiling shows the operator* from shared_ptr gets inlined, it just seems to take more time. I double-checked that the boost assertion is off.

I would be very grateful if anyone can explain where the difference might come from.

Additional stand-alone test: https://gist.github.com/1335014

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+1, I was thinking about this the other day too. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 2 '11 at 21:28
7  
Cache effects? shared_ptr is bigger than a raw pointer, so your array will cover more cache lines and take longer to read. –  Alan Stokes Nov 2 '11 at 21:40
    
What platform are you running these tests on? –  SoapBox Nov 2 '11 at 21:51
    
All test runs were done on x86_64 linux. Tested compilers were GCC 4.5 and 4.6, and clang 2.9. Boost was 1.46.1 in all cases, the linked timings are for GCC 4.5. –  Bart Janssens Nov 2 '11 at 21:53
1  
Why an array of pointers? Shouldn't you be dereferencing the same pointer many times? –  Emile Cormier Nov 3 '11 at 16:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

As Alan Stokes said in his comment, this is due to cache effects. Shared Pointers include a reference count, which means they are physically larger in memory than a raw pointer. When stored in a contiguous array, you get less pointers per cache line, which means the loop has to go out to main memory more often than it would for a raw pointer.

You can observe this behavior by, in your raw pointer test, allocating SIZE*2 ints, but also changing the de-reference loop to stride by i+=2 instead of ++i. Doing this yielded approximately the same results in my tests. My code for the raw test is below.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/timer.hpp>

#define SIZE 1000000

typedef int* PtrT;

int do_deref(PtrT* array)
{
    int result = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i != 1000; ++i)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i != SIZE*2; i+=2)
            result += *array[i];
    }

    return result;
}

int main(void)
{
    PtrT* array = new PtrT[SIZE*2];
    for(int i = 0; i != SIZE*2; ++i)
        array[i] = new int(i);
    boost::timer timer;
    int result = do_deref(array);
    std::cout << "deref took " << timer.elapsed() << "s" << std::endl;
    return result;
}

Incidentally, using boost::make_shared<int>(i) instead of PtrT(new int(I))allocates the reference count and the object together in memory rather than in separate locations. In my tests this improved the performance of shared pointer dereference by about 10-20%. Code for that is below:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/timer.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/make_shared.hpp>
#define SIZE 1000000

typedef boost::shared_ptr<int> PtrT;

int do_deref(PtrT* array)
{
    int result = 0;
    for(int j = 0; j != 1000; ++j)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i != SIZE; ++i)
            result += *array[i];
    }

    return result;
}

int main(void)
{
    PtrT* array = new PtrT[SIZE];
    for(int i = 0; i != SIZE; ++i)
        array[i] = boost::make_shared<int>(i);
    boost::timer timer;
    int result = do_deref(array);
    std::cout << "deref took " << timer.elapsed() << "s" << std::endl;
    return result;
}

My Results (x86-64 Unbuntu 11 VM):

Original Raw: 6.93
New Raw: 12.9
Original Shared: 12.7
New Shared: 10.59
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4  
"Shared Pointers include a reference count," actually a pointer to a data structure with 2 ref counts, a pointer, a deleter, and maybe even a mutex (hopefully not). –  curiousguy Nov 2 '11 at 22:16
3  
@curious The size is 2 pointers - one to the real payload, one to the overhead. But none of that affects the cost of a simple deterrence. –  Alan Stokes Nov 2 '11 at 23:04
    
Ah, many thanks! I will adapt my test to make the comparison more fair. –  Bart Janssens Nov 3 '11 at 9:51

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