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I'm new at C++ and I am missing some terminology (couldn't ask a specific question to Google), so I'll try to be as clear as possible.

Let's say I have instantiated an object of class A. Then say, from a method of this object of class A, I create an object of class B.

In my class B, i want to use the object of class A as an argument (passed by reference if possible).

Is that possible?

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, in your method of class A you can reference the current instance of A using the keyword this. For example, you can provide this for class A to the constructor of class B.

My C++ syntax is a bit rusty, so here's a C# example that can be translated fairly literally to C++:

public class A
{
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        B b = new B(this);
    }
}

public class B
{
    public B(A parent) { // Do something with A, maybe store it in B for later reference
    }
}
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OK, maybe I wasn't clear enough, but I was indeed looking for something like this. Thanks everyone for your help, much appreciated. –  julien.d Nov 2 '11 at 22:22
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It's hard to tell what you mean by use the object of class A as an argument. You mean the one it was created from? Other than that it sounds like you're describing a circular dependancy. Maybe this is what you're looking for?

//B.h
class A;  //DO NOT INCLUDE.  This is called "forward declaration"
class B {
    A& parent;  //All `A` in this file must be reference or pointer
public:
    B(A& a);
};

.

//A.h
#include "B.h"
class A {
    B function();  //since it's not reference or pointer, must have include
};

.

//B.cpp
#include "B.h"
#include "A.h"
void B::function(A& a)
: parent(a)
{}

.

//A.cpp
#include "B.h"
#include "A.h"
B A::function()
{
    return B(*this);
}

Keep in mind, if B::parent is a reference, you cannot assign a B to another, you lose all copy semantics. If you need those, you'll have to make parent a pointer instead. Which is recommended, but you asked for reference specifically. A reference also requires that the A remain in memory as long as the B exists, which can be a tricky guarantee to make.

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Beat me to it, was righting this up right now :) –  rossipedia Nov 2 '11 at 22:08
    
As an aside, this is called a Forward Declaration. –  walkingTarget Nov 2 '11 at 22:20
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You will need to pass the creating object into constructor as a reference:

B b(*this);

Where you have:

class B {
public:
   B(const A &creator_) : creator(creator_) { }

private:
   const A& creator;
}

;

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