Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a Java Swing app (built in Netbeans 6.9), I have a JTable with 21 columns. About 14 of those columns consist of double values. The first 6 columns are dates and strings. At the 7th column, doubles start. Every column in the table will sort correctly by clicking on the header row of the table when the app is running -- except the 7th column. The table thinks this data is of type string and it sorts it as a string.

If I move the data to another column, that new column now sorts as a string. So the problem is not the particular column, but something about this data.

However, the data is defined as a double, pure and simple:

double x;
public double getX() {
    return x;
}

The columns of doubles that do sort correctly are defined the same way.

I even tried casting this problematic data to a double (even though it is already a double) and it didn't make any difference.

I also tried setting a cell renderer for the column that won't sort as a number (even though the other column don't need this step).

table.getColumnModel().getColumn(6).setCellRenderer(table.getDefaultRenderer(Double.class));

What else could be causing this column of numbers to sort as strings?

share|improve this question
    
Looks like a duplication of question 7299289. Please check stackoverflow.com/questions/7299289/… –  carawan Nov 2 '11 at 22:14
    
I do not think the problem is the same as question 7299289. However, I did resolve this issue by blind luck and the resolution does involve implementing getColumnClass in my subclass of DefaultTableModel. I'll answer my question and post my solution. –  MountainX Nov 2 '11 at 22:23
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I had to implement getColumnClass in my class that extends DefaultTableModel.

public class MyTableModel extends DefaultTableModel {

    public MyTableModel(Object[][] data, Object[] columnNames) {
        super(data, columnNames);
    }
            @Override
    public Class getColumnClass(int c) {
        return getValueAt(0, c).getClass();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
most confortable way in all cases +1 –  mKorbel Nov 3 '11 at 7:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.