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I'm basically looking for a python version of Combination of List<List<int>>

Given a list of lists, I need a new list that gives all the possible combinations of items between the lists.

[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]] -> [[1,4,7],[1,4,8],...,[3,6,10]]

The number of lists is unknown, so I need something that works for all cases. Bonus points for elegance!

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Bonus points for elegance! :) Two up-votes? –  Groo Apr 28 '09 at 16:55
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3 Answers

up vote 70 down vote accepted

you need itertools.product:

>>> import itertools
>>> a = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]]
>>> list(itertools.product(*a))
[(1, 4, 7), (1, 4, 8), (1, 4, 9), (1, 4, 10), (1, 5, 7), (1, 5, 8), (1, 5, 9), (1, 5, 10), (1, 6, 7), (1, 6, 8), (1, 6, 9), (1, 6, 10), (2, 4, 7), (2, 4, 8), (2, 4, 9), (2, 4, 10), (2, 5, 7), (2, 5, 8), (2, 5, 9), (2, 5, 10), (2, 6, 7), (2, 6, 8), (2, 6, 9), (2, 6, 10), (3, 4, 7), (3, 4, 8), (3, 4, 9), (3, 4, 10), (3, 5, 7), (3, 5, 8), (3, 5, 9), (3, 5, 10), (3, 6, 7), (3, 6, 8), (3, 6, 9), (3, 6, 10)]
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Just what I needed, thanks! –  Lin Apr 30 '09 at 18:49
    
Could someone explain the meaning of the asterisk in *a? –  Serrano Pereira Feb 4 '13 at 20:20
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*a means these are arguments being passed to the function or method. def fn(a,b,c): would respond to fn(*[1,2,3]) reference –  marshall Feb 12 '13 at 23:37
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The most elegant solution is to use itertools.product in python 2.6.

If you aren't using Python 2.6, the docs for itertools.product actually show an equivalent function to do the product the "manual" way (he says, cheating by pasting in the sample from the python docs):

def product(*args, **kwds):
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1)
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)
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I'm using 2.6 now, but thanks for the info! –  Lin Apr 30 '09 at 18:50
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listOLists = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]]
for list in itertools.product(*listOLists):
  print list;

I hope you find that as elegant as I did when I first encountered it.

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What's up with that semicolon? :) –  Paolo Bergantino Apr 28 '09 at 18:29
1  
Force of habit. I love how Python lets you put one semi-colon, just to help us ol' C/Java programmers. But it's clear ; is not really a statement terminator when you do something like print("foo");; which is perfectly legal in C or Java (albeit pointless) but banned in Python. –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 28 '09 at 23:55
    
I do. I was pretty amazed by it. :) –  Lin Apr 30 '09 at 18:51
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