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I want to match either foo bar baz or bar baz foo. foo can be in either position, but it must be present. I'm not too familiar with lookaheads, and look behinds, but I feel like that's got to be the way to do it. Any tips?

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can it be in both positions? –  Bohemian Nov 2 '11 at 23:37
    
Is "bar baz" a constant and foo the pre or post fix? Or is bar baz just filler where you want your string to start or end with foo? –  Eric H Nov 2 '11 at 23:37
    
@Bohemian: It can be in both positions, but probably won't. –  Gordon Fontenot Nov 2 '11 at 23:38
    
@EricH: bar baz would be end up being it's own set of options (bar|baz would have been more accurate), but that part has to match. –  Gordon Fontenot Nov 2 '11 at 23:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There may be a cleaner way to do this, but the following should work:

/^(?=.*foo)(foo )?bar baz( foo)?$/

http://www.rubular.com/r/7wEVNi5G1Q

Alternatively, you can just use | to match one option or the other:

/foo bar baz|bar baz foo/
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I like the /^(?=.*foo)(foo )? bit, Thanks. –  Gordon Fontenot Nov 3 '11 at 0:06

Since the bar baz might actually be something complicated, I at least want to suggest a cleaner solution for more complicated cases: build the regex:

$foo = 'foo'
$barbaz = 'bar baz'
$regex = "($foo $barbaz)|($barbaz $foo)"

translate to your language of choice ;) I'm always surprised when I see a regex for an url or email totally written out, why not build it, that way it stays debuggable...

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Great idea. That bar baz bit is, indeed, more complicated than I made it sound. I'll try building it as you suggested later on. –  Gordon Fontenot Nov 3 '11 at 0:08

This might sound "too simple", but how about this?

(foo bar baz|bar baz foo)
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(foo bar baz|bar baz foo) would work and is way easier to read than using look aheads or look behinds.

Edit after comments:

(foo (bar|baz)|(bar|baz) foo)
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