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How can I get a ruby Time object that represents the start of the day on a particular date in a given timezone.

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Just a comment as I don't know anything about Ruby's time zone handling: midnight doesn't always exist, and it might occur twice. Brazil changes its clocks at midnight, for example. You should probably find the start of the day, instead. –  Jon Skeet Nov 2 '11 at 23:43
    
Interesting point. For my purposes the start of the day is what I'm interested in. Thank Jon. I'll update the question. –  Blake Taylor Nov 2 '11 at 23:46
    
What is your actual use case? (I found this question because I wanted to get the most recent midnight in California, as UTC, for API quota tracking.) –  David James Aug 1 '12 at 5:25

3 Answers 3

date = Date.today

date.to_time.in_time_zone('America/New_York').beginning_of_day

Currently outputs => 2011-11-02 00:00:00 -0400

Time.now.in_time_zone('Asia/Shanghai').beginning_of_day

Currently outputs => 2011-11-03 00:00:00 +0800

date = Date.today

date.to_time.in_time_zone('Asia/Shanghai').beginning_of_day

Currently outputs => 2011-11-02 00:00:00 +0800

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I wish it were that simple. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that the time you arrive at, after the timezone conversion, is in the same day. Sometimes it will be and sometimes it won't depending on the starting and ending zone. I suppose I could compare the date component after the conversion with the original value and adjust if necessary but that's really clunky. What I'd hope for is an elegant way to do it that always works. Hopefully there is something in the api, I don't think this is a crazy thing to want to do. –  Blake Taylor Nov 3 '11 at 2:02
    
I might not understand completely what you're trying to do but date.to_time.in_time_zone('TIMEZONE').beginning_of_day gives you 00:00:00 UTC for the original specified date. –  Timothy Hunkele Nov 3 '11 at 2:58
    
It's doesn't give you 0 UTC, it gives you 0 in the timezone, which is preferable. But, it doesn't do this before converting timezones with in_time_zone so the date is not necessarily valid anymore. Here's in example of what I mean. date.to_time.in_time_zone('Asia/Shanghai').midnight.in_time_zone(Time.zone).mid‌​night #=> One day in the past.. Ideally, ruby should allow me to do something like this. date.to_time(zone). –  Blake Taylor Nov 3 '11 at 16:27
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I ended up using the #local method on the ActiveSupport::TimeZone object passing components of the Date object.

# Get example date and time zone...
date = Date.today
timezone = ActiveSupport::TimeZone['America/New_York']

# Get beginning of day for date in timezone
timezone.local(date.year, date.month, date.day)
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Not sure if this helps, but this gets me the time at which my Google API quotas reset:

# The most recent midnight in California in UTC time
def last_california_midnight
  (Time.now.utc - 7.hours).midnight + 7.hours
end

I use it like this with Mongoid, for example:

def api_calls_today
  Call.where(updated_at: { '$gte' => last_california_midnight }).count
end

This will work no matter what timezone the code is deployed to, as long Mongo is set to UTC.

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