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I've read a fair amount of posts on the subject, and I think I finally understand how the volatile keyword works in C#. Still I wanted to ask here just to make sure I understand the concepts properly. Consider the following code:

class ThreadWrapper
{
  public bool Enabled { get; set; }

  private void ThreadMethod()
  {
    while (Enabled) { // ... Do work }
  }
}

From what I understand, if another thread were to set Enabled=false, the original thread may not actually see this change right away (or perhaps ever?). To make sure the compiler doesn't optimize access to the Enabled property and rely on cached values, changing the code as follows should fix things.

  public bool Enabled { get {return mEnabled;} set {mEnabled=value;} }
  private volatile bool mEnabled;

Now whenever the Enabled value is read, it is guaranteed to get its most current value, correct? If so, I should be able to use it as a simple signal or flag (like I have above).

As another example, consider the following:

class C
{
  private volatile int i;
  private volatile bool enabledA;
  private volatile bool enabledB;

  void ThreadA()
  {
    i = 0; // Reset counter
    while (enabledA)
    {
      // .. Do some other repeated work
      if (i > 100)
      {
        // .. Handle threshold case
      }
    }
  }

  void ThreadB()
  {
    while (enabledB)
    {
      // .. Do work
      if (condition) // Some condition occurs that we want to count
      {
        i++;
      }
    }
  }
}

For simple inter-thread communication like this, is volatile satisfactory here? I understand that i++ isn't an atomic operation, but if one thread is doing all the incrementing and another simply wants to read it to see if it reaches a certain threshold, we're okay right?

Edit: I course I found another similar question with detailed answers after the fact.

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1  
I love using volatile for instances where I need a way to flag on a per object basis and I don't want a lock for each object. eg some of my apps that do batch processing have multiple threads that work on objects in a list and one thread that writes out to objects as they complete. I just have the worker threads flip a volatile value when they're done with a given object and the writer thread just spin/sleeps waiting on that value as it walks the list. –  Bengie Dec 7 '11 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I believe you are correct.

MSDN's article on the volatile keyword uses this very same technique in its example.

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Yes, this should be safe, and is one of the intended uses of the volatile keyword. Note however that you should not loop merely to test the condition; if you want to simply wait for it to change, use a proper synchronization primitive to avoid wasting CPU time. Note also that this technique only works because you have only one thread writing; if multiple threads try to increment the counter, you may lose counter hits (because the read-modify-write is not atomic).

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I think these are great points to make. From what I can gather volatile is really only useful for simple cases like mine above. I'm learning that multithreading safely can be a pretty tricky endeavor. –  Jeremy Nov 3 '11 at 17:28

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