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I'm a bit confused about a line in Python:

We use Python and a custom function to split a line: we want what is between quotes to be a single entry in the array.

The line is, for example:

"La Jolla Bank, FSB",La Jolla,CA,32423,19-Feb-10,24-Feb-10

So "La Jolla Bank, FSB" should be a single entry in the array.

And I'm not sure to understand this code:

  1. The first char is a quote '"', so the variable "quote" is set to its inverse, so set to "TRUE".

  2. Then we check the comma, AND if quote is set to its inverse, so if quote is TRUE, which is the case when we are inside the quotes.

  3. We cut it with current="", and this is where I don't understand: we are still between the quotes, so normally we should not cut it now! edit: so and not quote means "false", and not "the opposite of", thanks !

Code:

def mysplit (string):
    quote = False
    retval = []
    current = ""
    for char in string:
        if char == '"':
            quote = not quote
        elif char == ',' and not quote: #the first coma is still in the quotes, and quote is set to TRUE, so we should not cut current here...
            retval.append(current) 
            current = "" 
        else:
            current += char
    retval.append(current)
    return retval
share|improve this question
2  
For the record, the csv module does exactly this. In actual code I would strongly suggest you use it instead of a custom function. – David Z Nov 3 '11 at 1:08
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're viewing it as though both if char == '"' and elif char == ',' and not quote were run.

However the if statement explicitly makes it so that only one will run.

Either, quote will be inverted OR the current value will get cut.

In the case where the current char is ", then the logic will be called to invert the quote flag. But the logic to cut the string will not run.

In the case where the current char is ,, then the logic for inverting the flag will NOT run, but the logic to cut the string will if the quote flag is not set.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks John, what i don't really get is what not quote means here : elif char == ',' and not quote: , if "not quote" is equal to false, this makes sense to me. But how to understand it, i thought the logic was : "and the inverse of quote", and because quote is set to false at the beginning, the inverse would be TRUE... which is not how this works, do you know what i mean? – Paul Nov 3 '11 at 1:25
1  
I know what you're trying to say, but remember that quote will only be set to TRUE if we're inside a quoted string, in which case the condition not quote will evaluate to FALSE, and the 'cut string' logic will not run. – John Weldon Nov 3 '11 at 1:28
    
yeah, thanks a lot, that's what i expected, thanks for the quick answer! – Paul Nov 3 '11 at 1:33

That is initializing current to the empty string, wiping out whatever it may have been set to before.

As long as you are not inside quotes (ie. quote is False), when you see a ,, you have hit the end of the field. Whatever you have accumulated into current is the content of that field, so append it to retval and reset current to the empty string, ready for the next field.

That said, this looks like you're dealing with a .csv input. There is a csv module that can deal with this for you.

share|improve this answer

current is reset to empty because in the case where you have encountered ',' and you are not under "" quotes you should interpret that as an end of a "token".

This is definitely not pythonic, for char in string makes me cringe and whoever wrote this code should have used regex.

share|improve this answer

What you're looking at is a condensed version of a Finite State Machine, used by most language parsing programs.

Let's see if I can't annotate it:

def mysplit (string):
    # We start out at the beginning of the string NOT in between quotes
    quote = False
    # Hold each element that we split out
    retval = []
    # This variable holds  whatever the current item we're interested in is
    # e.g: If we're in a quote, then it's everything (including commas)
    # otherwise it's every UP UNTIL the next comma
    current = ""
    # Scan the string character by character
    for char in string:
        # We hit a quote, so turn on QUOTE SCANNING MODE!!!
        # If we're in quote scanning mode, turn it off
        if char == '"':
            quote = not quote
        # We hit a comma, and we're not in quote scanning mode
        elif char == ',' and not quote:
            # We got what we want, let's put it in the return value
            # and then reset our current item to nothing so we can prepare for the next item.
            retval.append(current) 
            current = "" 
        else:
            # Nothing special, let's just keep building up our current item
            current += char
    # We're done with all the characters, let's put together whatever we were working on when we ran out of characters
    retval.append(current)
    # Return it!
    return retval
share|improve this answer
    
thanks Bryan, you said exactly what i expected, this is where it confuses me, We hit a comma, and we're not in quote scanning mode : so and not quote means quote is set to false, BUT, i thought this was the inverse of the original quote so we're in quote scanning mode, because the inverse of quote = false is quote = true ! so and not quote does not mean "the inverse of", but just means "false" right? i would understand if this was correct ;) otherwise, i'd be still confused! – Paul Nov 3 '11 at 1:19
    
if char == ',' and not quote means "whenever quote is false", whereas if char == '"': quote = not quote means "whenever there's a quote character, change the value to the opposite". So at the first quote of the string, it gets set to true. Then, whenever it hits the second quote, it gets set back to false. Since the next character is a comma, and quote is now false, then it appends what it's been tracking to the return list. – rossipedia Nov 3 '11 at 1:27
    
yeah true, this was a bit confusing to me but yeah i get it, this is what i wanted to read on this topic : and not quote is not about and its opposite is but really means : quote is equal to false. Thanks for your quick answer! Cheers! – Paul Nov 3 '11 at 1:35

This is not the best code for splitting but it is pretty straight forward

   1 current = ""

   # First you set current to empty string, the following line
   # will loop through the string to be split and pull characters out of it
   # one by one... setting 'char' to be the value of next character

   2 for char in string:

   # the following code will check if the line we are currently inside of the quote
   # if otherwise it will add the current character to the the 'current' variable
   # 

   3     if char == '"':
   4         quote = not quote
   5     elif char == ',' and not quote:
   6         retval.append(current) 

   ### if we see the comma, it will append whatever is accumulated in current to the 
   ### return result.
   ### then you have to reset the value in the current to let the next word accumulate


   7         current = "" #why do we cut current here? 
   8     else:
   9         current += char

   ### after the last char is seen, we still have left over characters in current which
   ### we can just shove into the final result

   10 retval.append(current)
   11 return retval


   Here is an example run:

   Let string be  'a,bbb,ccc

   Step  char  current   retval

    1     a      a        {}
    2     ,               {a}       ### Current is reset
    3     b      b        {a}
    4     b      bb       {a} 
    5     b      bbb      {a}
    6     ,               {a,bbb}   ### Current is reset

   and so on
share|improve this answer

OK you aren't quite there!

1.the first char is a quote ' " ', so the variable "quote" is set to its inverse, so set to "TRUE".

good! so quote was set to the inverse of whatever it was previously. At the beginning of the prog, it was false, so when " is seen, it becomes true. But vice versa, if it was True, and a quote is seen, it becomes false.

In other words, this line of the program changes quote from whatever is was before that line. It is called 'toggling'.

  1. then we check the coma, AND if quote is set to its inverse, so if quote is TRUE, which is the case when we are inside the quotes.

This isn't quite right. not quote means "only if quote is false". This has nothing to do with whether it is 'set to its inverse'. No variable can be equal to its own inverse! it is like saying X=True and X=False - obviously nonsense.

quote is always either True or False - and nothing else!

3.we cut it with current="", and this is where i don't understand : we are still between the quotes, so norm ally we should not cut it now!

So hopefully you can see now that, you are not between the quotes if you reach this line. the not quote ensures that you don't cut inside a quote, because not quote really means just that - not in a quote!

share|improve this answer
    
thanks sanjay! yeah basically i understood that not quote should mean false to make sense, but i thought "not quote" in the condition also meant the inverse of the original variable, but if not quote means "only if quote is false". this is perfect and make me understand it as i expected it to be!! thanks – Paul Nov 3 '11 at 1:30

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